ARCHIVAL VIDEO: Hiroshima Survivors Work to Keep Their Memories Alive, Long After They're Gone

Aug. 4, 1995: Hiroshima survivors ensure their stories are passed on to future generations.
3:37 | 05/16/16

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Transcript for ARCHIVAL VIDEO: Hiroshima Survivors Work to Keep Their Memories Alive, Long After They're Gone
In Japan today on the eve of the fiftieth anniversary of the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima. And unusually clear apology from that city's mayor he is calling this an occasion and these are his words to apologize for the unbearable suffering. The Japanese colonial domination and war inflicted on so many people. It is also an occasion to listen to the bucket shop that is the Japanese term for the survivors. ABC's mark the key is in Hiroshima. She saw coats hockey Oca still finds it very difficult to visit Hiroshima as a memorial peace park this was ground zero on that terrible day here at the memories are more intense more painful I mean. Looking at an amendment of the 1990%. Is looking immune sixteen here. I was thrown out of my house and knocked unconscious. And I came to for the hostess who Tacoma. I so so many people whose horrible things. A little red dead bodies. His skiing repeating can hanging from the Phoenix. You carting out helped me mother. He's keeping me one day. Though not seriously injured herself tightly Oca son spends much over time today keeping the painful memories alive. Teaching Japanese children the horror of what happened here and the need to banish nuclear weapons forever. She believes this year there is even greater urgency. And some 200000 people who were in Hiroshima that day are still living. But many are worried that soon there will be no one left to describe firsthand the devastation and suffering. So as the fiftieth anniversary approached an increasing number of survivors began writing emotional man lost. And putting memories to canvass to record for future generations divisions that are there is and theirs alone. This until local one survivor feels an even stronger duty to preserve those visions for his streets. Hiroshi Harada was six when the bomb was dropped shielded from the blast by a concrete building. Today a Rada is director of the Hiroshima atomic bomb museum. Filled with the grisly photographs of the dead and dying. Artifacts to testify to the incredible power and heat of the explosion. A life size display of a mother and child walking through the fire storm. Sometimes Harada says he's so overwhelmed by at all he's unable to speak. Emotion shared by many visitors as well including America. Its cues patents its. There's also a new exhibit at the museum this year that delves into Japan is military aggression. The first time there are references to the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor and a mass murder of civilians in China. Assistant director Harada says history must be honest to Puerto learn from it. That means confronting the terrible things Japan did before the bomb was dropped. Most Japanese visitors here seem to agree to it that's been. Until now he says we've only talked of being victims says it's important to admit we were aggressors to. However accurate the museum's most bomb survivors believe it's still their responsibility to impress upon the world what happened here you know it. It fleeing. Only living witnesses to to Helen and if that. Did. They can only hope the memories are kept alive but the last eyewitnesses are gone. Mark that he ABC news Hiroshima.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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