Capturing Vietnam: Veteran ABC cameraman on the dangers of filming a war

"On The Frontlines of the Television War" tells the story of Tony Hirashiki's years on the battlefields of Vietnam.
3:03 | 12/28/17

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Transcript for Capturing Vietnam: Veteran ABC cameraman on the dangers of filming a war
Reporter: It was the first televised war. Searing images from vtnam unfolding in American living rooms. This is the story of the Vietnam war. Reporter: Dispatches from combat Zones courtesy of lented photo journalists who were risking their lives. One of the best now stepping out from behind the camera. Is that the one that you would jump out of the helicopters with? Yeah, beginning it. I have to shoot how the soldier is suffering. So close-up of rain, water, or close-up of shoes in the mud. Soldier suffering. Reporter: In his memoir "On the front lines of the television war," yetsutsene, or as we call him Tony, describes the ten years he spent covering the war in Vietnam. He was there when ABC's Roger Peterson was shot in front of his very eyes. When he came out from bush, I saw his blood. He was shot, arm and finger. I always shoot. But my correspondent was so shocked. I throw camera and start to do something, but I just -- kind of was sobbi or crying. Reporter: Hiroshiki braved the dangers alongside the best and brightest ABC had to offer. Sam Donaldson, Peter Jennings, and this rookie -- Ted Koppel, ABC, south Vietnam -- He look like baby face. Reporter: For three decades hiroshiki captured a first draft of American history. But his accent remains stubbornly Japanese. He covered presidential politics to international summits. I remember being in Moscow with Sam Donaldson, and Sam insisted on working with Tony, so did every other anchor there. What made Tony a good cameraman? Tony had life experience. He had the beautiful eye to see like a story. Reporter: His humanity helping guide young talent on both sides of the camera. Every producer had a story about why they had to work with Tony. They'd change shoot days to match Tony's schedule. There's a whole generation of journalists who are as good as they are in part because of Tony. Reporter: Hiroshiki retired a few years back. But this generation of anchors like Bob woodruff and David Muir will always remember him fondly. But investigators say -- Do you remember any of those early standups? One of them I remehber. Just ten minutes before, no, already the show started. You came. "Make sure I don't mistake." I came to you, the show's alrey on the air? Yeah, yeah. Nothing's changed. Thank you for having patience for all of us. All these years. You are one of my correspondents too. Ask I'm proud of that. Proud of that, Tony.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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