As COVID-19 spread through the US, live streaming helped these people make ends meet

From a restaurant-owning couple to a team of fitness instructors, people talk to “Nightline” about how they adapted to the current moment and found new routes to success along the way.
6:02 | 09/04/20

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Transcript for As COVID-19 spread through the US, live streaming helped these people make ends meet
zing with the rise in live streaming. It's 95 degrees outside. 300 degrees over the grill. Hey, daddy jack's cooking the blues here. Reporter: But daddy jack Chaplin is cool as ice. The chef? You want the intense heat. Reporter: Live streaming to hundreds of fans on YouTube live. We've got Russia. We've got Greenland. The regular united nations here. That's right. The viewers are YouTube friends. Reporter: Before covid-19 hit, they ran a full-time restaurant in New London, Connecticut called daddy jack's. How many people have tuned in? Right now there's about 258. Reporter: Wow. As millions were pushed indoors, people like jack took their passions and professions from concerts. Don't believe me Reporter: To cookouts, extreme sports and extreme using platforms like twitch, YouTube and patrion raking incomes in from the comfort of their homes. It slowly, slowly was getting more dangerous. Reporter: Forced to shutter their door, jack and Lakesha had to find another way to make ends meet. I think probably the end of March when we started the account, jack found the platform. It's helping us to stay above float very comfortably. From Sweden, from Chicago. Reporter: Lakesha recently resigned from her job to solely focus on video production and managing the social media channel for jack. Behind the camera and doing all the video work. Never in a million years did I think I would be on this platform with him. Reporter: In June, the state of Connecticut began to allow restaurants to provide both indoor and outdoor dining service. Due to jack's live stream going so well, he opted to keep the restaurant dine out only. They think of it as an additional revenue source. But to say it's able to cover your bills, that's a giant leap, right? The world is in a financial crisis. It's a true blessing, you know, to have this opportunity. There are certainly creators who have been able to make that gap from streaming as a hobby to streaming full time based off the income that they earn. Reporter: Erin Wayne is the director at twitch, a leading streaming platform. Though the site has been associated with gaming, they have made anything and everything into a live experience. If you're passionate about something you can stream it. And the way these creators are utilizing it is not just to put content out there but really to engage with the community of users. So it takes social media one step further. Reporter: Erin says today's versatility of live streaming comes as no surprise. In the lightcovid, they're seeing twitch is becoming a really good place to form the relationships. Reporter: But some other streamers expect audiences to do more than just sit and watch. Look at that. You got 15 seconds. Reporter: Eric Salvador is the lead instructor at fitting room, New York City. Ready, here we go, three, two. Reporter: And today he's kicking my butt, virtually. You got Michael Strahan, Matt Gutman, Maggie Rulli, they have me do the workout today. Reporter: A workout guru who is used to being in the studio around the clock. We're worried, as soon as the doors closed, we were like ready to launch. Reporter: That's when fitting room founder found she needed to bolster the online platform. We immediately made it more accessible to not just our clients but anybody anywhere. Within three days of closing our studios, we were up and running with fitting room live which is our virtual platform. Reporter: It has allowed her to expand. You're actually hiring? We doubled the size of our corporate team, have a studio business to run, but we also have a global digital platform that we want to grow. Reporter: At what point, you know, during this time were you like, you know, I think this live stream format is sustainable? Even if we do open up eventually, we can still offer these great classes, because there a lot of people we can actually reach out to, outside of New York. I think it's here to stay. Reporter: Back in Connecticut, daddy jack and I are finally getting a taste of our hard work. Some fresh ahi tuna steak. With another successful stream and a steady flow of money coming in, he's now considering selling his restaurant. Is live streaming the retirement plan? Absolutely. It satisfies my creative needs. Reporter: But for jack and Lakesha, at the end of the day it's about connection. The relationships are still personal. It's hard to fathom the ability to Connecticut with that amount of people for that amount of time. Making connections all over the world. Reporter: These days the two are breaking bread in the comments section. If I ever get to visit the usa, I'm making it my plan to visit daddy jack. My best to you all, jack. Our thanks to ashan.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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