From inside a DEA drug raid to EMS reviving addicts: Part 2

"Nightline" embedded with federal agents in Arizona as they raided a suspected drug trafficking ring and first responders in Florida as they saved a young woman's life.
6:14 | 08/24/17

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Transcript for From inside a DEA drug raid to EMS reviving addicts: Part 2
We're hitting the main houses. Arizona and day three in our week-long look at the opioid epidemic. They're looking at the multimillion-dollar drug ring. One of the suspects, Joel Lopez, and others in the house, run. Senting agents on a foot chase. Neighbors are cleared from the scene. As the chopper arrives to help police find runners. The main suspect is in the winds. The suspect runs anyway. He's not only scared of us but the cartel he's getting this dope from as well. He owes them the money. Within seconds, the sound of the chopper faith away. Lopez is caught. He's the main guy behind the particular cell transporting and trafficking in all this. Jackpot. We pulled out 15 pounds of heroin. The street value? Over $1 million. How many individual doses might they get out of this. Wow! Thousands. This is tip of the iceberg according to the D.E.A., this organization is selling 40 to 50 pounds a month, hundreds of thousands of doses. So a multimillion-dollar operation out of that little house. The D.E.A. Believes it is helping to fuel the overdose deaths but there's no way of knowing just how many. That's in part because the most recently confirmed numbers are from 2015 which is why the public health community is asking for a database of real-time tracking. On day five, we're with the E.M.S. In manatee county. We're responding to a possible overdose call. An area so hard hit by the opioid epidemic, that now every overdose call gets answered by police, the E.M.S. And the fire department. They said almost half the money they spend on medication this year has gone to narcan used to reduce overdoses. They've already administered 1,222 doses in the first six months of this year. The human toll comes with no price tag and does not discriminate. Heroin epidemic should be viewed as a disease like alcoholism. It is a very tough struggle. Which is why the manatee county paramedics now follow one the people they've treated. What do you think is going to help you be successful this time? Well, I do stay around a different culture. It's a lot easier. Early Tuesday morning was the last time I used an opiate. From opening new rehab centers to a new drug court. Mental health counseling services -- During the week, several governors singned bills. This will help to us save lives. Back in manatee county- 911. Tell me exactly what happened. I just came across this girl. She's overdosing. Is she breathing normally? No. We arrive to find a young woman, lifeless. You said she has a syringe? She's given a dose of narcane. The one thing standing between her and death. And then even though we can't show you, she opens her eyes. Overdose, okay, you can breathe. Has this happened before? We're going to take you to the hospital and get you checked out. Okay? Do you think you can sit a little bit? One, two, three. Tonight she's been given another chance at life. In Kentucky, Veronica's parents are saying goodbye to their daughter. But for her parents, there's one silver lining. Ple a chance tol live. There would have been not one good thing that would have come out of this. It made little sense of a senseless situation. During the week we tracked, she was one of 28 overdose victims who also donated their organs, according to the united network for organ showing. It tushls orns out there are no adverse effects. More than 33,000 Americans die from overdose every year. We've never seen anything quite like this. I'm Pierre Thomas. In Phoenix, Arizona. Simply extraordinary reporting for Pierre Thomas. I know you've been covering this story for a long time and there's one aspect that has really haunlth you. There is a case from last December, a little girl 5 months old who died in her crib because both her parents overdosed and they weren't able to take care of her and she died. If that doesn't bring home how serious and lethal this ongoing epidemic crisis is, I don't know what does. And your reporting helps wake even more people up. Thank you very much.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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