Janet Mock on portraying trans people of color on screen, fighting for LGBTQ equality

The acclaimed writer, director and producer of FX’s “Pose” speaks about trans people of color’s history of fighting for equality and why telling their stories can help educate others.
4:54 | 06/27/20

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Transcript for Janet Mock on portraying trans people of color on screen, fighting for LGBTQ equality
I spent many years in my career not be being out as a trans woman for fear of being fired by my employees. Janet mock is a trans trail blazer, on the emmy-winning show but for years she kept a part of herself secret. Describe what that's like for someone to live in fear of losing their job simply because of how they identify. One thing we constantly tell young trans people is be unapologetic about who you are, who you love. Don't leave parts of yourself at the door when you walk into spaces. And now, finally, we have protection for that. Reporter: That protection came from the highest court in the land, at a time when trans visibility and acceptance is breaking new ground. On June 15th, the supreme court ruled that it's illegal to discriminate against employees for being gay or transgender. My reaction was overwhelming joy. In the past few weeks, there haven't been many victories, so it was so great to wake up and see that our supreme court really backed the people. Reporter: The fight for lgbtq rights triggered five decades ak at the stone wall inn, a gay bar in greenwich village. But there are hidden figures in the history of pride. This is a moment in our history when we are reexamining history. And one of the points of pioneering lgbt work was after the stone wall riots, and I think maybe mainstream America doesn't understand the important role that trans women played in the stone wall riots. Talk to me about activists like Marsha P Johnson and Sylvia Rivera and why sometimes trans women of color are left out of history books. I think it's the history books for a lot of marginalized people have been written not by them. So the true events of stone wall, 1969, you know, really have to center lgbtq people of color, trans women of color and gender non-conforming people and specifically hearing people speak the names of Marsha P. Johnson and Rivera are, we do exist in a moment for a long time didn't address the particular needs of black and brown trans women and trans women of color. Reporter: But as trans women of color are being celebrated they're still very much in danger. The American medical associate described antitrans violence as epidemic. Last year we highlighted the story of Malaysia booker, just one of the 18 trans women killed that year. She was a target in her home town of Dallas. A transgender woman punched and kicked. The next time it could be someone else. Reporter: But Malaysia would never see justice. Weeks later in the quiet of an early morning, Malaysia was found murdered. At approximately 3:00 P.M., the victim was positively identified as Malaysia booker. Reporter: Her death now a rallying cry. The eyes of the world are on us. Reporter: Pose shows the danger they face. Candy, a vibrant young woman who is unapologically herself -- It's our time, our time to be sign. Reporter: -- Is murdered after engaging in sex work. That's the foreboding boogeyman that follows every trans woman of color in America. We know all too often the names and the stories and the lives cut too short because of this kind of violence and ignorance and harassment. Reporter: Mock just signed a three-year, multi-million studio deal with Netflix and plans to continue to tell stories of her trans brothers and sisters. In this moment of reckoning in this country, how can white people, how can sis gendered people be allies, and learn to help move forward positively? I'm seeing all these demonstrations, the different kinds of people out there showing up, not just in the streets but also in the boardrooms, on their social media, really educating their audiences, so I think that right now partnership is truly what we

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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