Veteran severely injured in Afghanistan given smart home to help accommodate needs

U.S. Marine Corps Staff Sergeant Jesse Cottle lost his legs from an IED blast in 2009. On the new home built for him, he said, "As a family, I think we'll be able to...do so much more at home."
2:41 | 11/12/19

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for Veteran severely injured in Afghanistan given smart home to help accommodate needs
Today sergeant Jesse Cottle is being given the keys to a new life. After years of putting his life on the line, Cottle, his wife Kelly, and two daughters, grace and Isla, are the newest owners of this smart home outside Boise, Idaho. This foundation and this house are so amazing. Just bringing -- literally restoring Independence. Reporter: Back in Afghanistan Jesse was on a 2009 mission to clear improvised explosive devices when he took an unfortunate step. Detonating an ied that would launch him into the air. The moment captured on a fellow marine's helmet cam. I remember being blown into the air, but it was immediately like in the movies where everything is muted and quiet. That's pretty accurate. Reporter: At 24 years old Jesse would lose both of his legs. A big part of helping me come to terms is just that my family and friends were able to come and be by my side at different times. Having faith in god, that was a big part of it for me. Reporter: As his family grew, they too learned to adapt to daddy's needs. Even homes that weren't built with men like him in mind. There were a lot of things that he couldn't do, and of course I never want him to feel badly about that. Reporter: But today this home marking a new chapter for the family. For us to be able to actually be settled in the community and have a proper home to call ours and for our girls to grow up in -- sorry. It's going to mean a lot and be super poignant over the holidays to celebrate there together. I'm very thankful. Reporter: All possible because of organizations like the Gary sinise foundation's rise program and its donors like the Home Depot foundation that's helped veteran families like the cottles build a home of their dreams. New neighbors, family, and other veterans. This home the result of a year-long community project helping the cottles feel at To be able to raise our daughters in a home that's literally built up by a community to loves their dad and our family and Americans that love their veterans and their wounded, it means so much to us. We salute all of our veterans today and every day. Thank you for your service, and welcome home.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"duration":"2:41","description":"U.S. Marine Corps Staff Sergeant Jesse Cottle lost his legs from an IED blast in 2009. On the new home built for him, he said, \"As a family, I think we'll be able to...do so much more at home.\"","mediaType":"default","section":"ABCNews/Nightline","id":"66931727","title":"Veteran severely injured in Afghanistan given smart home to help accommodate needs","url":"/Nightline/video/veteran-severely-injured-afghanistan-smart-home-accommodate-66931727"}