Woman with white supremacist tattoo gets it covered up as part of path to redemption

Jeremiah Hirsch, a tattoo artist in Virginia covers tattoos associated with racism for free. Andrea Einhaus, who had an iron cross on her back, had it covered up after making new friends.
6:22 | 10/09/20

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for Woman with white supremacist tattoo gets it covered up as part of path to redemption
Hey, how's it going? Hi. Andrea. Very nice to meet you. Come back here and let's talk about this drawing. Reporter: Andrea ihouse is on a powerful journey. This is the design I came up for you. Most of the cover-up is going to be in this area -- I have to live every day with the guilt of being brought up racist. Reporter: It took her years to get to this Virginia tattoo parlor where she says it feels like she's about to be cleansed. It's very literally erasing the hate. When it's physically, and you know, you're able to see that washed away from your body, it's almost like being baptized. Reporter: She was just 17 years old when she had the mark of white supremacists tattooed on her back. It's an iron cross. Like when you look at neo-nazis today, and they might have a swastika tat too, they might have those two lightning bolt tattoos, they might have an iron cross. Did you know what it represented? I was aware of what people could take away from it, and that didn't bother me. That's a problem. Reporter: She didn't think much of it because of where and how she grew up. A mostly white community in North Carolina, where racism was a way of life. I was so indoctrinated. I was very brainwashed. So it was very acceptable to believe that African-Americans are just -- lower than white people. That gay people are -- an abomination. Immigrants aren't welcome. Reporter: But when she moved away to Virginia in 2007, she had different people moving into her world. What was on your mind on the way to the tattoo shop when you were getting -- about to get it covered up? My best friend. Hm. She's jewish. I don't love, you know, being the center of attention. I don't love being on camera. So when they brought this opportunity to me, I did not want to do it. And the reason that I did do it was because I've owed this to the people that I've offended. Are you excited? Reporter: Jeremiah Hirsch is the tattoo artist fredericksburg who's doing this for free. He's calling this "The erase the hate" campaign, and there are holocaust survivors in his family. It's heartbreaking. To hear about her upbringing. To be raised in such a hateful environment and think that that's okay. But so beautiful today to, like -- to erase that from her. Reporter: All he asks is that she and others who he's helping make a small donation, $100 or more, to groups that help minorities. There has to be bridges built. Even with my parents being pastors, I remember going to church on Sunday and, like, you would have the black congregation would be on this side of the church, and we would be on the other side. And I never fully understood that. Then when you look into the history of it, when, like, segregation was still in, and like when slavery was, they would have to sit upstairs. As we've seen segregation go away and more unity involved, why is there still this separation just because of like, is that what we're used to? Reporter: It's in the meeting of different people and the understanding between those people where racism starts to die. And yes, even in god's house, where Dr. Martin Luther king himself once said that Sunday is the most segregated day in America, it takes effort. Our pastor and our leader, pastor Kimberly Jones! Reporter: This is limitless church in Georgia. Yeah! Reporter: Pastor Kimberly Jones says there used to be no black members. When my mom and dad turned it over to me a few years ago, man, all white people. I looked out Sunday. This place is packed. And I thought, look at this rainbow. Looks like heaven. What heaven's going to look like. How did that happen? I don't even know. I really don't even know. The bible says -- Reporter: People of her church told us it's because of moments like this. That's pastor Kim joining the protests over the police killings of black Americans. One person can change the world, and that's you. They need to be heard. My people need to be heard. You said my people. But I wonder if it's because these are truly your people. They're my people. Me as a caucasian, me as a white woman, my job is to fight for the ones around M so that they can have the same privileges that I have. Every time I even see a caucasian say "All lives matter," I just wish for a second they could switch skin and walk in it for a second. Do a heart check. Keep you out of heaven. Reporter: Andrea einhaus suffered through four hours of agonizing pain to cover the racism painted on her skin with a playful drawing that reminds her of a sister who died. Looks amazing, thank you. Reporter: She wishes anyone who chooses only to judge her for what she's become today. What do you say to other people out there who might have something like that on them? I would say that it is certainly unfortunate that you have this tattoo, but that does not set the tone for your life. Your behavior does. And the way that you interact with people. So this doesn't have to control your life. And it's okay to say you were wrong. Our thanks to Steve O. Be sure to join our conversation with #turningpointabc. We'll be right back with a

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"duration":"6:22","description":"Jeremiah Hirsch, a tattoo artist in Virginia covers tattoos associated with racism for free. Andrea Einhaus, who had an iron cross on her back, had it covered up after making new friends. ","mediaType":"default","section":"ABCNews/Nightline","id":"73515306","title":"Woman with white supremacist tattoo gets it covered up as part of path to redemption","url":"/Nightline/video/woman-white-supremacist-tattoo-covered-part-path-redemption-73515306"}