NTSB recommends Boeing, FAA change process in certifying jets

These are the first informal guidelines put forth since the Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max crashes.
1:38 | 09/26/19

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Transcript for NTSB recommends Boeing, FAA change process in certifying jets
The lock air and Ethiopian airlines crashes from last October in this march killed a combined 346. People. And prompted the grounding of all Boeing 737 maxed yet. Thursday the NTSB revealed that the pilots in those crashes were dealing with a flurry of alarms some federal safety investigators never tested for in flight simulators are test flights. When certifying that aircrack. In both crashes failed sensors that bad games to the planes mistakenly engaging the anti stall systems which knows those planes down. While that was happening multiple alarms were going off in the cockpit yet yet he says that barrage of distractions but to even more confusion in what was already a chaotic and stressful situation. Captain Sully Sullenberger told congress in June no pilot could have been prepared for prior to these accidents I think it is unlikely. At any US airline pilots were confronted with this scenario and simulator training. Thursday NTSB chairman Robert some Walt saying we saw in these two accidents that the crews did not react in the waste following in the FAA assume they would. Now the board is recommending changes to the process in certifying jets. Including factoring in human responses when things go or rye. These are the first formal guidelines put forth since the crash is that they are just recommendations. And the FAA does not need to implement them. The FAA did issue a statement in response to these recommendations saying they would carefully reviewed them and they also say the investigations into these crashes. Would be a springboard to a greater level of safety. Cover all ABC news New York.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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