Lyle Menendez on What His Life Is Like in Prison: Part 11

"I found that my own childhood prepared me surprisingly well for the chaos of prison life," Lyle Menendez said.
3:21 | 01/06/17

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Transcript for Lyle Menendez on What His Life Is Like in Prison: Part 11
Even after all these years, I still don't understand why a Lyle and an Erik could have done that. Something happened during the course of their childhood that turned them into murderers. Something happened. Every mother's day, I think about kitty Menendez, because what they did to their mother was horrific. It was pure, unadulterated evil. It was just extremely tragic. I have thought since the trial that if the Menendez brothers were the Menendez sisters, they would be free today. We don't want to think, oh, boys get raped by their father. We don't want to think that that happens. I've come to the conclusion that I think that god really wanted me to stay on this Earth long enough to be able to resurrect the reparation of one of the most beautiful, classy woman I've ever known, and that's my sister, kitty. Here we are, 27 years later, and people still come up to me and say, so, how are the boys doing? And I say to them, well, they're not boys anymore, they're men. Prison is not a relaxed environment, so, it is a level, a high level of stress, but I found that my own childhood prepared me surprisingly well for the chaos of prison life. You have your periods of depression and sadness and certainly, you know, you feel that loss of freedom deeply, but I feel like there's a lot of purpose, there's still a lot of purpose in life, even in confinement, if you want it. I've pretty much just poured my energies into helping quality of life here, helping people with their rehabilitation goals. Lyle, like myself, we don't want to be defined by the worst thing we've ever done. And for most of that, that requires us acknowledging what we've done. Many people don't want to talk about what they've done, because it's so shameful. But when we can just expose ourselves to that shame, it makes us just a little bit more human. I'm more a fully formed adult now. Of course, looking back, it's shocking to think about, that that happened and that I could have been involved in taking anyone's life, and my parents' life. It's still jarringly -- it seems unimaginable, because it seems so far removed from who I am and who I was. I don't know what helps some people survive it better than others. And to a degree, I don't foal like I did. I mean, is there that much difference between a kid who goes through that, commits suicide or kills his parent and ends up doing life in prison? It's still a failed, destructive ending. That's part of the tragedy of it. It could so easily have not

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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