Ebola Patient in Texas in Critical Condition And an All Out Effort to Save American Journalist With Ebola

Dr. Richard Besser discusses his return home after being in the Ebola hot zone and what he encountered at the airport.
3:57 | 10/06/14

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Transcript for Ebola Patient in Texas in Critical Condition And an All Out Effort to Save American Journalist With Ebola
As we come on the air, a crucial window of time. Doctors monitoring dozens of patients who might have come in contact with that patient in Dallas. And this would be the time when anyone would be begin to show symptoms if they caught it. In the meantime, something else we've learned. All eyes on that Dallas hospital. The patient now in critical condition, on a ventilator. Now, he's receiving an experimental drug to try to save his life. From the heartland tonight, these images from Nebraska. Where that American journalist, a photographer infected with the virus arrived in the U.S. Today. There he is, suited up in white. Getting onto that stretcher himself. This evening, our Dr. Richard Besser is the just back and we ask, was he stopped at the airport. Plus, what the president just said about airports across this country. First, ABC's Cecilia Vega starting us off in Dallas. Reporter: David, good evening to you. Thomas Duncan is on his eighth day in isolation here at this hospital. As you mentioned, he's on that ventilator. He is receiving dialysis after kidney failure and doctors say his condition is worsening. He's now in critical. As Thomas Eric Duncan fights for his life, doctors are now administering an experimental ebola fighting drug. This, after officials had said that medicine would make him even sicker. I can't answer whether he would have taken that experimental medicine earlier or not would have made a difference. I can't answer that. Reporter: Since Duncan became the first ebola patient ever diagnosed in the U.S., 800 calls a day pouring into the CDC, skyrocketing up from the usual 50. Officials now trying to ease fears. We don't have an outbreak. We have one event that is being handled properly. Reporter: That American video journalist who contracted ebola while working in Liberia, reaching American soil this morning. That's ashoka mukpo in a hazmat suit, walking off the plane in Omaha, Nebraska, before heading to a hospital quarantine unit. He looks strong. He walked off the plane gingerly, waved to us. You know, he's tentative and frightened. Reporter: In Dallas, where Duncan remains the only ebola patient, the clock is ticking for the ten people who had close contact with him. Now is the time ebola symptoms would most likely start to show, eight to ten days after their last visit with him. Also today, has mat teams finished cleaning out that Dallas parm where Duncan had been staying with his family. That is where they could have been exposed. Those teams destroyed nearly everything inside except for just a couple of personal items including some photos and a family bible. David? Cecilia Vega, thank you. The president, meanwhile, just before we came on the air tonight, said about ebola and American airports, that the administration is, quote, going to work on protocols, going to do additional passenger screening, both at the source and here in the United States. But soon after, white house aides saying additional score screening remains under discussion. Let's get to Dr. Besser who is back. You just talked to your sources at the CDC. Are there any plans in place? Reporter: They tell me they would consider any options that would truly make us safer. But for incoming screening to work, you'd have to have symptoms. I'm curious. Did they ask you when you came back? Reporter: They did. My pass port was flagged because of the reporting I've been doing. Were they asking other passengers where they had traveled to? Reporter: They hadn't. And that might not help? Reporter: It wouldn't. When I left Liberia, they took my temperature three times. They looked to see if I was healthy. Then they gave me this sheet. It's a list of similymptoms to watch for for 21 days. And you and the team taking your temperature a couple of times a day? CDC recommends it. I took it this morning, I'll take it tonight. All right, rich, great to have you and the team back.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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