Flood-prone areas of Carolinas, Georgia racing to beat hurricane

Hospitals were trying to move as many patients as they could to higher ground while families with small children were waiting in lines for buses headed inland.
2:27 | 09/03/19

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Transcript for Flood-prone areas of Carolinas, Georgia racing to beat hurricane
the danger up through Florida and into the Carolinas. In fact, evacuation orders for more than 2 million people. We were at a hospital evacuating patients today in wrightsville beach. Homeowners and business owners boarding up. That wave crashing into a man in Florida. He was okay. ABC's Steve osunsami is in the Charleston, South Carolina, area tonight, where those evacuations are under way. A very long week ahead there. Reporter: At vibra hospital in Charleston, they're racing to beat the storm, trying to move as many patients as they can to higher ground before hurricane Dorian arrives. This patient is on his way in an ambulance tonight to a V.A. Hospital two hours away. We have ten patients that are confirmed to leave and there will be others today. Reporter: Not everyone is healthy enough to be moved. David Eason is fighting a serious blood infection and will ride out the storm in his hospital bed. If they tell you to go, go. If you can. My situation, I can't. Reporter: They call this the low country for a reason. Flood-prone areas in the Carolinas and Georgia could be fighting several feet of storm surge by tomorrow night. If you live in a residence that flooded over the last four years, you should evacuate your residence and move to higher ground. Reporter: In Savannah, families with little children and little means had to wait in the heat and long lines for a bus ride to safety. Not everybody can pick up and leave, and I'm one of those people. I don't have a vehicle and I don't have the finance to go out of town and rent a motel or anything like that. Reporter: Even to the south, where the waves are strong enough to knock you off your feet, they're watching for possible flooding. Authorities are trying to get the message out, that as families leave for days, police will be watching their homes. Already they've arrested this man accused of breaking into condos. All right, steveosunsami with us, he's outside that hospital tonight in Charleston. Steve, you were telling us, they're trying to get all of their evacuations done by tomorrow? Reporter: Yes, David. The CEO of the hospital explains that he wants all of his people off the road and done moving patients by the time the first tropical storm-force winds reach Charleston. Another thing, authorities are warning residents who choose to stay to stay off the roads. They point out, during last year's hurricane, they had to rescue more than 40 people from flooded vehicles and they'd rather not do that again. David? Calm and dry there, but not for long. Steve, thank you.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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