Hurricane Odile's Wallop

The Mexican coast gets hammered and monsoon-like rainfall as far as Arizona brings severe flooding.
2:14 | 09/16/14

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Transcript for Hurricane Odile's Wallop
We begin with ABC meteorologist rob Marciano in Arizona, where they are preparing for those fast-moving floods. Reporter: After hammering the Mexican coast with 1 125-mile-an-hour wind and record rains, odile's effects already bringing monsoonal moisture as far as Arizona, sparking storms, derailing this train and ripping this roof. Okay. I think that will do it. Reporter: Residents in Phoenix are bracing for the storm. My garage flooded the last time around, so -- trying to get ready. Reporter: Just last week, record rains turned this Phoenix highway into a water-filled graveyard of abandoned cars. This week, odile expected to dump twice as much rain on the southwest. In Cabo San Lucas, local areas were destroyed. These friends rode out the storm in the hotel. Our flood flooded out. It was definitely the scariest night of my life waiting for that hurricane to pass. Reporter: The airport in los Cabos is still closed, but Angela and Kenna were two of the few flown into Tijuana on a military plane as today the Mexican government started airlifting stranded tourists out. David, the sandbags are this neighborhood's last line of defense against what could be another raging flood tomorrow. David? Rob, thank you. ABC meteorologist ginger zee is in New York tonight tracking it all. And ginger, first, the floods. What are we facing? Reporter: David, we are on flash flood watch. Anywhere from Las Vegas own to El Paso. You could see four or six inches of rain in the coming days. Let me time it out for you. The remnants of odile making its way up. Tucson is in the laser focused area of four to six. Give you some perspective for Tucson. Usually you'd have about three quarters of an inch average for September. Already this month, 2 1/2 inches. Now, all-time record for September made it to 5.6 and I think we could catch it, David. All right, ginger zee with us tonight, as well. Ginger, thank you.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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