Questions swirl around pilot in fatal plane crash in California

The National Transportation Safety Board said there is no evidence the crash that killed four on the ground was intentional
1:53 | 02/07/19

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Transcript for Questions swirl around pilot in fatal plane crash in California
the growing mystery surrounding that plane crash in California, killing the pilot and four people inside the home that that plane crashed into. Well, tonight, questions about the pilot, who had a fake I.D. And now, it turns out, he was not a marine as he had said. ABC's chief national correspondent Matt Gutman with the investigation. Reporter: Tonight, as the NTSB investigates this plane crash captured by so many cameras, questions are swirling about the man who flew the plane that seemed to explode over a southern California neighborhood. Found in that plane's wreckage, pilot Tony pastini's I.D. The pilot of the Cessna plane, a male, has now been positively identified as Antonio pastini. He is a retired Chicago police officer. Reporter: Only now, the Orange county sheriff's office and Chicago police say the badge he had on him and the laminated retirement card inside were forged. The Pentagon also says that pastini, who had legally changed his name from Jordan Isaacson, had lied about being a marine. Plus, the plane he flew and lost control of, an eight-seat Cessna, had its registration listed as pending. His daughter defending him. I'd prefer not to comment and let the investigators do their job. Reporter: The NTSB telling ABC news tonight there is no evidence this crash was intentional. All right, so, let's get to Matt tonight. Despite all of these questions about the pie lot's background, the NTSB believes there is no reason to believe this was anything more than an accident? Reporter: That's right, David. They believe that he became disoriented in a cloud, overcorrected, became disoriented and lost control of that aircraft. Now, the FAA says he did have a valid commercial pilot's license, which, David, does not require a background check. All right, Matt Gutman on this again tonight. Thank you, Matt.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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