Surprise launch from North Korea to the Sea of Japan

The North Korean leader, Kim Jong Un, is sending a direct message to President Trump by launching short-range projectiles to test him and attempt to get more diplomatic talks to happen sooner.
2:12 | 05/04/19

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Transcript for Surprise launch from North Korea to the Sea of Japan
Now to the major headline overseas. The surprise launch from north Korea. What are being called short range projectiles. Will the provocative action knock already tense relations between president trump and Kim Jong-un even further off balance? What the president and north Korea are saying tonight. The latest from ABC's white house correspondent Tara Palmeri. Reporter: Tonight, Kim Jong-un sending a message directly to president trump, firing off a series of short-range projectiles into the sea of Japan. The escalating show of force, coming as diplomatic talks between the U.S. And North Korea are at a standstill. Trump walking away from the Hanoi summit when Kim refused to commit to full de-nuclearization. Sometimes you have to walk and this is just one of those times. Reporter: Kim leaving with crushing sanctions still in place. This test, a sign he's losing patience. Since Hanoi there's been a series of low level, but very provocative actions by the north that signal their frustrations with the lack of sanctions relief. Reporter: Though both sides are holding firm to their demands, the president optimistic he can still get a deal, tweeting, "I believe that Kim Jong-un fully realizes the great economic potential of North Korea, and will do nothing to interfere or end it." Adding, "He also knows that I am with him and does not want to break his promise to me. Deal will happen!" In a recent trip to Russia with leader Vladimir Putin, Kim Jong-un said the U.S. Acted in bad faith in Hanoi, but this latest move may be an effort to restart talks. He's trying to ramp up the pressure to bring trump back to the negotiating table. Tara Palmeri joins us from the white house, and Tara, late word tonight from the north Koreans that those projectiles were long range rocket launchers and tactical guided weapons? Reporter: That's right, Tom. What's key is that these are not intercontinental blis you can missile, meaning they can't carry nuclear weapons and can't travel long distances. Kim Jong-un promised in 2017, even before negotiations started that he would stop launching those missiles, and so far it looks like he's sticking to that promise, Tom. Thank you. This programming note. The latest on the U.S. Response to North Korea. When Jonathan Karl goes one-on-one with U.S. Secretary of state Mike Pompeo tomorrow morning on "This week."

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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