Trump may resume family separation policy at US-Mexico border

The president might be considering a new version of his failed "zero tolerance" immigration policy which resulted in thousands of children getting separated from their families.
2:55 | 10/14/18

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Transcript for Trump may resume family separation policy at US-Mexico border
Ian, thank you. From Washington tonight, president trump is weighing a new round of family separations at the u.s./mexico border. It comes as the administration released new video of a Texas detention center home to 2,400 unaccompanied minors. Here's Tara Palmeri. Reporter: Just weeks out of putting a spotlight on immigration. This amid a report his administration is considering a new take on family separation at the border. We have the dumbest immigration laws in the world. The world laughs at us. But we're getting them changed. Reporter: While the president says family separation could deter illegal immigration -- If they feel there will be separation, they don't come. If they feel there's separation, it's a terrible situation. Reporter: He cited no evidence and gave no proof that undocumented immigrants are bringing children into the country to bypass immigration laws. Everybody wants to come in and they come in illegally and they use children in many cases, the children aren't theirs. They grab them, and they want to come in with the children. Reporter: According to "The Washington post," the president is considering a plan that gives parents who cross the border illegally two choices -- stay in detention for months or even years with their children as they await immigration proceedings. Or allow children to wait in government facilities until relatives are located. Even the first lady saying she was blindsided by the policy, and she's against it. You know, it was under your husband's policy, the zero-tolerance policy, that these families were separated. That enforcement. Is this somewhere where you disagreed with him? Yes, and I let him know. I didn't know that that policy will come out. I was blindsided by it. I told him at home. And I said to him that I feel that's unacceptable. And he felt the same. Reporter: The crackdown on illegal immigration ended in June because of legal setbacks, but many children remain in detention. U.S. Officials say more than 200 are not eligible for reunification or release. The department of health and human services, out with a new video from inside a Texas detention center where 2,400 children are housed. Here they are seen playing, eating together, and bunking in tight quarters. Tara, you're getting fresh reporting on the unprecedented action the president was ready to take to free Andrew Brunson from Turkey? Reporter: That's right. My sources tell me president trump was so determined to get Brunson back, he ordered a plan to remove all U.S. Diplomats from Turkey. And in fact, these diplomats were nervous this would be executed. But as we know, Brunson was returned on Friday. Tom?

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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