US climber describes frenzy atop Mount Everest: 'It was scary'

Ed Dohring said he was elbowed and shoved by fellow climbers who'd reached the summit and were more focused on taking a picture than others' safety.
2:25 | 05/28/19

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for US climber describes frenzy atop Mount Everest: 'It was scary'
A second American climber has died after reaching the summit. 11 deaths there in just the past ten days. A record number of permits have been issued this season, creating essentially traffic jams on the mountain. Delays that can threaten lives. Tonight, our James Longman is in Nepal with new images and the chilling description of what an American climber witnessed. Reporter: Tonight, chaos at the top of the world. This stunning new video shows that crush of climbers struggling to summit Everest. 11 now dead in just ten days, among them two Americans, including 62-year-old Chris Kulish from Colorado. Fellow American Ed Dohring was on the same climb team as Kulish and described a frenzy at the peak, a space he said was about the size of two ping-pong tables side-by-side. I was several times elbowed, push aside, shoved by people who were just focused on getting their ideal picture or getting a banner out that they could take a picture of. It was scary, because if you lose your footing, potentially you're going to slide off is summit. Reporter: Kulish and the first American victim, Utah native don cash, both died on their way down after successfully summiting, both were experienced climbers. That's not the case for Too many inexperienced people are on the mountain. Not only are we having more people climbing at the same time, but we have more and more people, I think, over the years, that are climbing without the experience they need. Reporter: He described climbing around a dead climber on his way to the summit. A record 381 permits have been issued to climb Everest this year. And because of bad weather, over 200 people were forced to summit on one good day. But the traffic jams create an hours-long wait in what's called the "Death zone," where a lack of oxygen and exhaustion test even the world's best climbers. And James Longman reporting in for us tonight. The climber you interviewed described stepping around the dead climber, the jam of climbers slowing their decent from the top. Really just horrifying stories. And people are going to ask, why are they allowing so many climbers at once? Reporter: Well, David, there are more and more tour groups offering lower and lower prices, and those lines you saw there are caused in part by inexperienced climbers unable to use complicated equipment. That causes loads of people to wait behind them in dangerous conditions. David? James Longman in Nepal for us

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"duration":"2:25","description":"Ed Dohring said he was elbowed and shoved by fellow climbers who'd reached the summit and were more focused on taking a picture than others' safety. ","mediaType":"default","section":"ABCNews/WNT","id":"63332489","title":"US climber describes frenzy atop Mount Everest: 'It was scary'","url":"/WNT/video/us-climber-describes-frenzy-atop-mount-everest-scary-63332489"}