Venezuela's most needy trying to stay alive in hospitals amid blackouts

President Nicolas Maduro is blaming the U.S., with no proof, and accusing American hackers of sabotaging the country's electrical grid, crippling the nation.
2:36 | 03/13/19

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Transcript for Venezuela's most needy trying to stay alive in hospitals amid blackouts
in the dark. The crippling backout continues there. A desperate situation growing worse. Tonight, our team inside a hospital where the power is out, and families now across Venezuela say their loved ones are paying with their lives. Tonight, the U.S. Now responding to claims from the Venezuelan president that the U.S. Could be behind the blackout. ABC's Tom llamas is in Venezuela again tonight. Reporter: Tonight, V Venezuela's most needy trying to stay alive in hospitals just like this one, with little or no power. You can see, this is the situation here in some hospitals there is no power. This is a private hospital, they do have a generator, but it's not enough power to power the entire floor at times, you can see patients are being wheeled out in the dark. This is the reality in Venezuela. Guiding us through this dark maze, the hospital's E.R. Chief. The facility invited us in to see the desperation. Parts of the hospital relying on a generator, but they have to conserve power, to keep patients like Romero Andrade alive. Since the nationwide blackout six days ago, he's been in a coma, battling colon cancer. His daughter tells me they were treating him using flashlights. The director of the hospital telling me they are running out of time,. Already, they've sent some patients home. I have 67 years, never in my life I have seen something like this. Reporter: All of this, as reports of stores being looted while families scavenge for food and water anywhere they can. The crisis on full display right through the center of Caracas. Families getting water from this polluted river. President maduro is blaming the United States. Without proof, accusing U.S. Hackers of sabotaging their electrical grid, crippling the nation and leading to chaos. And so let's bring in Tom llamas, reporting from Venezuela tonight. Tom, first off, what's the reaction from the trump administration tonight about these claims from president maduro that the U.S. Could be behind the blackout? And secondly, are U.S. Diplomats leaving as they've been told to do? Reporter: Well, David, secretary of state Mike Pompeo says the U.S. Played no role in the collapse of the electrical grid. He says the real culprit is maduro's, quote, incompetence. The U.S. Is pulling out all U.S. Personnel and secretary Pompeo says it's because of a deteriorating situation here in Venezuela, and David, we have seen it everywhere since we've been here, people taking baths in that river of filth, to mothers carrying wrong jugs of brown water, to the darkened hospitals, even the airport has no power, David. All right, Tom llamas, great to have you back in Venezuela. Tom, thank you. From London tonight, a major blow to prime minister Theresa

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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