'Queer Eye' stars discuss the show's impact and success

Jonathan Van Ness, Antoni Porowski, Tan France, Karamo Brown and Bobby Berk share how the show's reboot allowed them to connect with so many Americans.
8:53 | 11/28/18

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Transcript for 'Queer Eye' stars discuss the show's impact and success
eye" has become a feel-good pop culture phenomenon and now they're sharing some behind the scenes advice in their new book "Queer eye: Love yourself, love life." Please welcome "Queer eye's" fab five. ??? True story, antoni told me what to do so I did but he heard the wrong thing. It happens sometimes. All the time for me. We get lost sometimes in public. Yeah, we do. I so badly want to hug you guys. I love the show. With all the negativity in the world your show is inspirational. It's unconditional love. People in the audience love you guys. Thank you. Karamo, let's start with you. What a year it's been, 2018 for you guys. You've won three emmys. You've just been named entertainers of the year. What has all this attention been like? It's been amazing for us. For five gay guys to go into rural America and feel as if we're making a change in bridging people together, it feels really good. Then you're doing it with your brothers, people you love. It's pretty amazing. You do go into trump country, don't you? We do. How does that work out? How does that work out for you? Oh, it's hard sometimes because, you know, you're greeting people who don't have the views that we have. Yeah. Yet, we go in there with empathy and love and we say we're going to find our common ground instead of looking at the differences so that we can grow together. We go in not defining somebody by a boat. We go into it defining them as people and they begin to define us as people. I heard one of them was wearing a make America great hat. What did you do with that person? I threw the hat away. That guy actually ironically, he and I are best friends. Are you dating him now? No, no, no. He is straight. I'm a happily engaged man. You are. You said you're a brid zilla though. I am, I'm sorry. I've been dreaming about my wedding since I was -- there's my baby -- since I was 12 or 13 years old. The minute I got to start planning a we had, I went full force. The other day on Thanksgiving we actually spent the first three hours of Thanksgiving in the emergency room because he had a panic attack. We thought it was a stroke or heart attack. What are you doing to him? I know. The doctor was like, what are you talking about? I'm like, the wedding. I can't help it. I just rented a big carnival wheel. Carnival wheel? Yeah. It's like -- It's a ferris wheel. Ferris wheel, yeah. It's going to be so fun. Are we invited now? I want to come. All of you are invited to my wedding. Okay. I mean, the other great thing about this show is you give people the opportunity to get to know you as people because I think most people don't realize that gay people have been around us all of our lives and a lot of times we have had to hide. So you suddenly meet folks and you think, okay, here's what I'm doing, what can you do? I know you had an experience with the preacher, yes? You want to tell me? What we're really trying to do is for people out there who have never seen us as people, we're just that group of individuals they don't agree with, they don't know anything about us. They just know that their church told them we're wrong. I -- especially growing up very religious in the church seven days a week and having the whole church turn their back on me, having a preacher message me, slid into my dms and said my whole life I was taught -- Direct message. Yes. Poor usage of the expression. That priest did not slide into your dm. Oh yeah. My whole life I was taught in church that homosexuality is a sin, they're pedophiles, heathens, they're definitely going to hell. And hearing you talk about how every single day of your life you cried, begged, pleaded and prayed for god not to make you gay but you still are shows me that it is a choice and you were born that way. That it isn't a choice. Sorry, that it isn't a choice. And so to hear that now, little kids growing up in that church aren't going to grow up and be taught to hate who they are, that's worth everything. I had a similar relationship. I grew up in Salt Lake City, Utah, a place that you now live with your husband who's an ex Mormon. I grew up as a Mormon. Current husband, ex Mormon. Also, you're a Pakistani Muslim. You're out about who you are in your life. What's the response been not just from folks in Utah who have their opinions about things but from around the world? I honestly thought I'd have a really strong adverse reaction to me. You haven't really seen this before in mainstream -- on a mainstream show, a big commercial show, so I was expecting the worst. I am so lucky to have received the most beautiful warm welcomes from people all over the world I was hopeful to receive that from Americans because sometimes they are wanting to be super liberal so they're going to throw loads of love my way but I wasn't expecting it from the Middle East. I get loads of dms every day saying it's so nice to see a verse of me on TV. As a kid I so desperately wanted to see a version of this on TV and I never did and I didn't know what my life would be and now it's lovely to be in a position to offer that for kids out there. We can't expect people to grow until we show them who we are. I think that's what we do on the show and why it's so important to us. People aren't going to be stuck when you say here's an opportunity for you to learn and I'm not going to judge you for learning and that's what we do the entire -- Time to learn. Because remember, this is new for lots of people still. And we're not lecturing like I'm this, I'm that. Here I am, this is me as a person. If you love me, great. If you don't, let's talk about it. Sometimes sexuality comes up after them getting to know us. It's secondary. Let me ask you something because the other day we were talking about the Thanksgiving day parade and there was a kiss from the show "Prom" -- "The prom" I guess it's called. A lot of people thought it was very wrong to do. A lot of people thought it was great. I wonder what you think of it. I think it's a reminder that the rest of the country is not New York and we need to remember that. But I think like -- Why? I'm so done making people feel comfortable. You think like 50 years ago someone like the person who hosted the first gay wedding, we've made a lot of advances but we're not there yet. Shows that shed light on teen suicide and the horrible pill problem for today's youth. It's the third highest telecast. All those people who say we're not New York, they love to come to New York and see these shows. Right. If this were a heterosexual couple kissing on TV we wouldn't have had a concern. We wouldn't be having some conversation. I have had to endure a lot of heterosexual kissing in my life. If it was an interracial kiss would we be having these conversations? The bottom line is we have to be more patient than everybody else is with us because they don't know what you know and what I know and what joy knows and what Abby knows, so we always -- Don't they watch "Will and grace"? I mean, how much do we have -- Or "Queer eye." Through the arts, something like Broadway. We talk about changing hearts on this show and it is shows like "Queer eye" that's actually do that in this country and around the world so thank you guys for all that you do. Our thanks to the fab five. You can catch the first two seasons of "Queer eye" on Netflix, and the "Queer eye" book is out now. Everyone in the audience is going home with a copy.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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