New technology may help detect COVID-19 in schools

A new device from Clorox is said to be able to track coughs, sneezes and fever in classrooms, and teachers and administrators to potential illness among students.
2:46 | 10/07/20

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Transcript for New technology may help detect COVID-19 in schools
It's an anthem for me. Yeah, I know. We got to get to a "Gma" exclusive. New tech that can help be a tool in the fight against the pandemic. Janai Norman with the latest. Reporter: "Gma" with an exclusive look at a new device said to be able to track coughs, sneezes and fever in the classroom. Teaming up with engineers and epidemiologist, Clorox, the company famous for bleach and wipes taking us along for its first test run in a classroom. How can it pinpoint coughs and sneeze jz. There is a microphone in the device and it is trained to look at the unique frequencies that are coughs and sneezes. The temperature is monitored with a thermal sensor. Reporter: At this empty school, researchers showed us how they say this illness symptom tracker works. To replicate real coughs and sneezes, researchers played audio files and staff used heated blankets and hand warmers to imitate fevers, all tracked on this dashboard accessible by computer. It says 109 coughs and sneezes detected. Three high temperature readings. This device time and time again is able to detect coughs and sneezes in the classroom. All along this is a race between us and the virus and any tool that we can use to give us a head start can really help. Reporter: With the help of epidemiologists Clorox says they determined the point at which teachers should take notice of possible illness in the classroom depending on size and other factors. For example, if a class24 students reaches 66 total coughs and sneezes in a seven-hour period an alert email is sent to administrators but experts caution just tracking symptoms won't catch all cases of covid-19. One of the great challenges and mysteries of covid is that people can be asymptomatic and still have covid. That means no cough, no sneeze, no runny nose, no fever. Reporter: While Clorox is looking for 100 schools across the country to participate in a trial run of this device, other schools are turning to different technology. One Houston area school district dispatching specialized cameras that the district says can take the temperature of up to 30 people at a time capturing readings while students walk into school or down hallways and motorola recently introduced an ai program it says T can help schools by calculating the distance between people and monitoring building capacity. The software also aiming to track mask compliance. Florida atlantic university confirming to ABC they're exploring using this technology in high-traffic areas on campus like the library. And as far as privacy concerns Clorox says its device does not record audio or any data that could identify student. People were concerned about that. Thank you.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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