Will kids be able to go trick-or-treating safely?

Dr. Jen Ashton answers questions about Halloween, vaccine distribution and more.
2:45 | 09/15/20

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for Will kids be able to go trick-or-treating safely?
now with our viewer Q and a on covid-19. First question is, to what can we attribute the overall fall in covid cases in the country? Well, more good news, Amy, the cases are declining, but if you look at the overall curve based on what was going on in Mah and April it went all the way up, then it came down, now it's up here, and so every time we hit a surge we're not coming back down to baseline, that's kind of the bad news. The good news, the case is declining to a combination of factors. Epidemiologists are not pointing to one thing. The nonpharmaceutical interventions, masking, social distancing playing roles. Local and state governments enacting laws and regulations and restrictions on high-impact, high-density indoor environments, definitely play a role. Bottom line is, it's not time to relax. Public health officials definitely warning that as we move indoors this virus really likes to spread rapidly in that type of environment. That's very important to remember as we head into the cooler months. Next question, is there an increased risk of blood clots if you contract coronavirus while on birth control pills? So no data on this yet, but two separate high-risk situations, so first of all, let's take birth control pills, any hormonal situations, birth control pills, iuds that have hormones in them, all increase the clotting risk to some extent. In general, the lower risk raise the risk to about 8 in 10,000 and then you look at covid, we know that part of the mysterious actions and impacts of covid on the body is an increase risk of clotting. Those together could increase the risk more, but we have no published data on this yet. All right, I mentioned the cooler months, Halloween a big time of year, this one asks, what are some of the concerns we can foresee with Halloween and trick-or-treating activities? You know, this is a question that's really important to think of the big picture here and not just covid. Every year as parents, we're talking about safety with trick or treating, in terms of avoiding cars, candy, strangers, you name it, no different this year, the good news is that usually you trick or treat outdoors, that's likely a little bit safer, again the masks the hands, the communal candy, all of those things need a little extra attention this year. Hopefully the kids will be able to have one of their big events. Yeah, I hope so. And some adults, too, by the way. I don't know what you're talking about. It's on a Saturday night this year. You can submit questions to Dr. Jen on her Instagram @drjashton. For many of us, 2020 began with canceled trips, at least

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"duration":"2:45","description":"Dr. Jen Ashton answers questions about Halloween, vaccine distribution and more.","mediaType":"default","section":"ABCNews/GMA","id":"73024092","title":"Will kids be able to go trick-or-treating safely?","url":"/GMA/GMA3/video/kids-trick-treating-safely-73024092"}