More than 100 people killed as tsunami hits near Jakarta, Indonesia

The deadly wave may have been triggered by underwater landslides following a volcanic eruption.
6:51 | 12/23/18

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Transcript for More than 100 people killed as tsunami hits near Jakarta, Indonesia
The damage from a devastating tsunami. That struck in nearby. The death tolls and injury tolls climbing overnight. The waves striking many without warning. You can see this concert stage suddenly heaving forward from the water's impact. Dragging people away. The tsunami may have been triggered by a volcanic on an island formed after one of the largest eruptions occurred it is krakatau volcano more than a century ago. Here's what we know so far. At least 222 people have been reported dead. 843 injured and at least 28 missing. Those numbers are sadly expected to rise. We have team coverage. We kick things off with Julia Macfarland in our London bureau. Julia, good morning. Good morning, Dan. Indonesia is still recovering from the last time this happened only three months ago. This time, however, huge waves have devastated an area close to the most populous part of the country, just a few hours drive from the capital. Reporter: This is the terrifying moment the massive wall of water came crashing on to the shores of Indonesia's most populous islands. The tsunami slamming into this celebration without warning, sweeping away everything in sight. The killer wave may have been triggered by this volcanic eruptions just after 9:30 in the evening near this island of krakatau. The massive fire exploding from the volcano visible for miles. The underwater landslide happening 124 miles from the capital of Jakarta. More than 220 confirmed dead, with more than 800 injured. The number of missing growing and expected to rise as rescue crews sift through the mess left behind. The water crashing 65 feet on land, decimating towns and hotels in the popular tourist area, packed with travelers on vacation for the holidays. The huge tide may have been affected by the full moon. Making the wave more devastating. The aftermath horrifying. The tsunami tearing apart hundreds of homes, sweeping away hotels, flooding streets and overturning cars. This morning the lead vocalist of a popular band performing under a tent speaking out announcing to his fans several band members were killed in the wave, asking for prayers for the missing, one of them his wife. The injured rushed to hospitals in the area, many needing to be tended to right on the streets. Rescue teams rummage through the rubble in search of survivors. The view from above capturing the devastation. Entire towns swept away. Local officials say Indonesia doesn't have a tsunami warning system for did he tektding tsunamis from volcanic activity because these systems rely on detecting earthquakes. This wave triggered by an underwater landslide. This comes after a massive tsunami hit killing at least 382 people. The areas around the straight are usually accessible. Aid workers tell us the roads have been damaged. There's no fears the devastation will prevent help from coming quickly to those who need it most. Julia, you were born in Jakarta and are familiar with this region. What can you tell us about the tsunami warning system and whether or not it worked in this case? Whit, it's notoriously unreliable. It suffered in recent years through lack of funding. Indonesia is hooked up on black berry, messenger and what's up. The news travels fastest on apps. The issue with this latest disaster is that the tsunami warning system monitors earthquakes and there wasn't one registered this time. We think it was caused by an underwater landslide. As far as we know there's no system in place that monitors that. Whit. Truly a devastating event. Julia Macfarland, thank you. Joining us now by phone we have a reporter with an Australian newspaper. You spent the day in the disaster area. Talk us through a little bit of what you saw as you started going through. This main area where -- last night is about 100 K from the capital Jakarta. All along the road we drove today you saw village after village hit hard by the wave. We saw cars picked up and overturned and strewn a don or so shipping containers. We saw a tralkt tractor that looked like it had been sent flying. We saw houses that basically had been flattened by the wave when it swept through last night. Talking to those people in those areas, are they able to get in touch with their loved ones to find out if everyone is okay? Unlike with an earthquake, there's been a couple of those in Indonesia, most of the communication infrastructure seems to be working. Some villages have a strong phone signal. Some have none. The other thing that stood out because it's near the capital, more help seems to be getting to people than the previous two disasters earlier this year. We saw dozens of army ucks, police vehicles, heavy Earth moving equipment, all those sorts of things. Help is getting through after what nearly 24 hours or so. There are a lot of people without power who lost their homes and lost their lives. Where are all those people staying now? Seems like a combination of relatives, there are some shelters set up for people who are now homeless and they're spotted through villages. Usually attached to a local mayor's office or something like that. Some will be sleeping in temporary shelters essentially outside. For people who have never been in that area, can you give us a sense of how populated that area is? Java which is the main island Indonesian island is home to something like 140 million people. It's a small island. It's very densely populated. I'm sure lots of help continues to pour in. James, thank you for joining us. We appreciate your help. Of course. Pleasure talking to you.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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