New concerns over radiation released from Russian blast

Residents in a small town near the blast site have taken matters into their own hands, testing for radiation with hand-held detectors.
1:53 | 08/14/19

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Transcript for New concerns over radiation released from Russian blast
the latest on that mysterious explosion in Russia that is raising radiation fears and confusion this morning about a canceled order to evacuate a James Longman joins us now from Moscow. Good morning, James. Reporter: Good morning, robin. It's been almost a week since this incident. The government is still keeping much of what happened secret. Radiation is now back to normal, but we should ask, are we still getting the whole picture here? This morning, confusion reigns in Russia. Orders given to evacuate near the blast site seemingly reversed. Now officials denied those orders were ever made, saying that routine measures were in place to address the incident. Concern is rising over how much radiation was released from the alleged accident. It's really important to test people who leave the village. Reporter: Residents nearby have taken matters into their own hands, testing for radiation with hand held devices. It's said 16 times more than normal levels have been detected. Not a threat to life, but more near the blast site. They reported it as a fire, involving a rocket. Officials say it was likely a test of Russia's new cruise missile dubbed skyfall by nato. They referenced the chernobyl disaster from 1986. The radiation contamination from that incident responsible for dozens of deaths years after the explosion. Experts say this incident is nowhere near that severe. It's the secrecy around this incident that continues to fuel fear and spespeculation, and it's shining a light on Vladimir Putin's nuclear ambitions. Are we headed for an arm's race? James, thank you.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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