Norway detects radioactive material after Russian explosion

Norway’s nuclear watchdog says tiny amounts of radiation have been detected 500 miles away from the explosion site.
2:02 | 08/16/19

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Transcript for Norway detects radioactive material after Russian explosion
Now to the very latest on that Russian nuclear mystery. Norway says it has detected radioactive material days after the deadly blast. James Longman is in Russia as close as he can safely get to that scene. James, good morning. Reporter: Good morning, whit. That's right. We are in the far reaches of northern Russia, where there's still so much secrecy around that nuclear missile blast. We got as close as we got to the site. Let's take a look for ourselves. This morning, looking for answers in northern Russia over that nuclear missile explosion which caused a radiation leak more than a week ago. We traveled as close as we were allowed to the blast site. This spot felt a radiation spike between 4 and 15 times the normal level. Not life-threatening, but concerning. It shows levels are back to normal. The potentials for far-reaching consequences is clear. The nuclear watchdog saying tiny amounts of radiation have been detected in northern Norway over 500 miles away. Authorities stressed the level detected though is very low, and poses no harm to people or the environment. When word spread about the incident, people rushed out to buy iodine. We tried to buy some here, but they have totally run out. The explosion killed five scientists and two defense person. The U.S. Officials say Russia was likely testing a new type of cruise missile dubbed skyfall. It is touted by Vladimir Putin as being able to hit any target in the world. This secrecy reminiscent of the far more serious disaster, chernobyl in 1986. This has prompted interest in Russian nuclear technology and the very real danger it poses. Now the radiation we're talking about here isn't life-threatening, but people are concerned that if or when there's an accident, they may not find out until it's too That is concerning indeed. James Longman, thank you.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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