Urgent search continues for missing submarine with 53 sailors aboard

Chief Global Affairs correspondent Martha Raddatz reports on the desperate hunt to find the missing Indonesian submarine, which is set to run out of oxygen in just hours.
2:01 | 04/23/21

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Transcript for Urgent search continues for missing submarine with 53 sailors aboard
We'll turn to the search for a missing submarine that disappeared. More than 50 people on board. With hours of oxygen left the U.S. Joined the search and Martha Raddatz has the latest. Good morning, Martha. Reporter: Good morning, this morning, the Pentagon is sending aircraft to help in the search for the submarine joining so many other nations in a race with the clock. This morning, the desperate search for the missing Indonesian submarine with 53 sailors on board. The last transmission with the sub more than 60 hours ago. The crew requesting permission to make a deeper dive to test-fire torpedoes but it never resurfaced and never another word. Today mere hours of oxygen left on the vessel and the only sign of the submarine, a wide swath of oil at the last known location near the island of Bali. The real worry here, an oil slick was discovered above the area where the submarine started its descent which would suggest that there was some sort of a catastrophic failure in the dive. This submarine was only certified to go about 800 feet deep but the depth of the water that it dove in is over 2,000 feet. If the submarine lost power and continued its dive it would not survive the depths of the bottom of the ocean at that point. Reporter: The rescue efforts taking place by air and sea. The U.S. Will join teams from Singapore and Malaysia with several other countries also offering to assist. But even if the submarine did not implode, the chance that the crew will survive gets slimmer by the hour. The real problem here is if there was a chance to save the crew or if the crew were still alive, time is of the essence. Reporter: And at this point the searchers have not positively located the sub so with just hours left and the oxygen supply, the Indonesians are truly hoping for a miracle, George. Oh, man, okay, Martha, thanks very much.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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