How Oregon is bouncing back after the COVID-19 pandemic

ABC News’ Kayna Whitworth explores Oregon’s gorgeous natural scenery and unique businesses.
4:33 | 06/17/21

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Transcript for How Oregon is bouncing back after the COVID-19 pandemic
Amy? You can see the whole story on hulu. Now it's time to "Rise & shine." Oregon, incredible sense of community there helping that state bounce back. Kayna Whitworth joins us from there. Kayna, you had a river view this morning. This is a state you're very familiar with, right? Reporter: Absolutely, robin. This is the gorgeous Columbia I love Oregon. I started my career here in bend, Oregon. If views like this aren't enough for you, if you like coffee, wine, chocolate, beer this state has a place for you. From the natural marvels to the man made, Oregon is a sight to behold. At the heart of this state a rich sense of community. Here in bend, Danny Davis says that's what kept his business afloat all last year. Our regulars and locals showed up in flocks. They were here to buy beer, anything to support us. Reporter: While you may come for the brews, you'll stay to soak in the beauty. Once named the best place to stand up paddle board in America, people flocked to this river for over 100 miles of paddling. Or step into a time machine at this '90's relic, the last blockbuster on Earth. Just outside of Portland, good rain farmer found Michelle week honors her native American ancestry, which saw a 300% boost last year in members hoping to invest in her farm. We're paying back our community with vegetables and sharing our stories of our native foods. Reporter: Known as the city of roses, Portland is home to the international rose test garden where they try out about 650 different varieties. It's a popular spot visited by over 700,000 people every year. The city is still healing after a tumultuous year. Emily Powell, owner of the world's largest independent book store, is hoping to rewrite the national narrative with Coinciding with the pandemic there was also riots in the city 100 plus days. What was that like being a business owner? For us it was still about how can we show up every day and open our doors to portlanders who want a book. Reporter: Powell celebrating 50 years in business. The line to get in his wrapped around the building. I feel buoyed by this community. I'm confident we can come through whatever comes our way. Reporter: Meet Heidi and Bruno. These St. Bernards will greet you at the snow lodge. Here at rockaway beach you'll find this steam engine. It was used in the film "Stand by me." It's got a lot of movie history. We're lucky to have it. Reporter: Hop on board and chase the breath-taking views. How unique of an experience of it to ride a steam train like this? We're the only coastal excursion on the west coach. Reporter: Oregon has more than 360 miles of coast line. Here at rockaway beach they're famous for the twin rocks. They jet out of the ocean. There's only sunny skies ahead here in Oregon. Now the governor says they are inching towards a 70% vaccination rate for all adults. You guys, that means more and more people in the state of Oregon will feel that sense of normalcy. Good for them. Boy, beautiful. So beautiful, kayna. Thank you. We'll check in with you later. Right now, Do not miss this morning and

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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