ABC News’ chief health correspondent answers viewer questions related to coronavirus

Dr. Jen Ashton speaks on whether kids should be using hand sanitizer, what to do if hot water isn’t accessible and knowing the difference between a cold or flu, allergies and the coronavirus.
2:15 | 03/08/20

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Transcript for ABC News’ chief health correspondent answers viewer questions related to coronavirus
Welcome back to "Gma." Concern about the coronavirus is growing with every new case in the United States. Our chief health correspondent Dr. Jen Ashton is keeping us all well informed. She's back with us to answer some questions from our viewers. The first one here is from Instagram, should kids be using hand sanitizer? School water isn't hot. So people are getting really granular about the specifics about handwashing. What matters is soap and water and time. With kids, you know adults don't wash their hands properly, so kids oftentimes obviously need supervision. So soap and water is best regardless of the temperature. But if not, then alcohol-based hand sanitizers with older children with supervision is important. Got it. We have been sending our kids off to school with hand sanitizer just in case, too. Second question, how long does the virus live on different surfaces? And please talk about any new possible treatment. The surface question is probably the most common question I've been getting. I want to be clear. This is a brand-new virus, we don't know specifically how long it can last on glass, metal, plastic or other surfaces. The range with other human coronavirus ranges from two hours to nine days with an average of four, five days. Money seems to be a little less risky, but again, money is considered dirty anyway. The treatment part -- They're working on a zillion different drugs. And how do I know the difference between allergies, a cold or the coronavirus? This is a really good question. It's a little bit complicated. Fever is a very common symptom with coronavirus. Colds usually don't have a fever, but you can get the cough and stuffiness. Allergies, no fever. Lot of people with coronavirus have body aches, extreme fatigue, so that's kind of -- if you have to grade all three the most severe in symptoms. Many, many people probably have no symptoms or mild symptoms. I know doctors are trying to rule out things like flu, cold, allergies. Very hard. Thank you so much. Still ahead here coming up

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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