Infotainment increases distracted driving: Study

Just two seconds of your eyes off the road doubles the chance of a crash, and GPS may be the heaviest cognitive drain, according to a new study from AAA and the University of Utah.
3:11 | 10/05/17

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Transcript for Infotainment increases distracted driving: Study
Let's go to Michael. A new report on distracted driving and those systems used to navigate texts and tune your radio. Aaa found out some may take your eyes and attention off the road for dangerous amounts of time and ABC's David Kerley is in Mcclain, Virginia, behind the wheel to give us a demo. Good morning, David. Reporter: Good morning, Michael. It is the new technology in these cars and by the way we are on a closed parking lot to show you in that really worries the aaa. These new systems that allow you not only to look at and listen to text messages but social media and say it can be a dangerous distraction. Tune, A.M., 830. Reporter: Watch this driver in the aaa study. Tuning to A.M. 830. Nearly hitting a pedestrian performing another tank he nearly hits a car. Aaa says just two seconds of your eyes off the road doubles the chance of a crash. Find address. Reporter: Aaa and the university of Utah found using gps navigation may be the heaviest cogny taif drain. Did you say Lake City, Utah. No. Reporter: Suggesting it takes 40 seconds to input an address. At 25 miles per hour a vehicle would have traveled the length of four football fields. A lot of these tanks like texting and navigation and so forth have high visual demand. They're also associated with heimen tall demand. Reporter: Researchers tested 30 vehicles with drivers and found 23 of them required high or heavy demand on drivers to operate. You go to contacts and look for Jake Nelson. Reporter: On a closed track we gave the systems a try which can be controlled by voice commands but there's also a touch screen. I'm getting text messages as I'm trying to call this person. So I think he may be Jake instead of Nelson so let's try Jake. Reporter: The auto industry which heavily discourages texting and driving is critical of this new research and the methods used. Their representatives telling us automakers have worked for years to help drivers focus on the road and drivers should avoid using handheld devices and instead use vehicle-integrated sidss that are designed to be used in the car and comparable to tuning the radio or adjusting climate controls. So basically what the auto industry is saying is you should use hands-free. That means just use the audio portion. When a text message comes in that's what that is, you push the button -- Please say your command. Reporter: Text messages and use it just through the audio system and that will be sufficient. The problem is that some folks in the aaa, this is also a touch screen and worried you'll come down and touch the screen and distract you. That's the concern, that's the debate, guys, about how this technology is helping or making us a little bit less safe. Seems like a valid concern. Valid concern but sometimes almost the cars do too much. Yeah. Just drive, be safe. You have kids driving cars like that too. You can't remind us enough about that. When you hear that, who's trying to get in touch with me, David, thank you for that.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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