Pentagon investigating Texas church shooter's past

Members of Congress are also demanding answers as the suspect, Devin Kelley, is now known to have escaped from a mental health facility and was able to purchase guns despite a domestic abuse conviction.
2:35 | 11/08/17

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Transcript for Pentagon investigating Texas church shooter's past
Now to new developments in that tragic church shooting in Texas. The Pentagon is investigates as we learn more warning signs were missed. The gunman escaping from a mental health facility in 2012 and our senior justice correspondent Pierre Thomas is in Washington with more. Good morning, Pierre. Reporter: Robin, good morning. The missed signals are mounting as members of congress are demanding answers as to how this killer was able to buy that murder weapon. And there's word that there might be many more cases line it and more details are emerging about Devin Kelley's past the more surprising it is he was allowed to buy those guns in the first place. A newly released police report shows Devin Kelley escaping from a New Mexico mental health facility in June of 2012. Temporarily committed, thought to be a danger to himself and others. The police report noting Kelley had been caught sneaking firearms onto Holloman air force base and was attempting to carry out death threats made on his military chain of command. Enormous problems with the background check system. Reporter: The airmen's struggle with mental health came after a court-martial after beating his then wife and infant stepson and served a year in prison for domestic abuse. When you only have one instance of a domestic violence incident being reported by the military, there's a problem. Reporter: That conviction should have barred him from being able to purchase guns. But the air force never forwarded the information to the FBI which does gun background checks. This is clearly a loophole that is a problem. Reporter: The defense department inspector general is also going to look across the department to make sure everything is checked and that all procedures are clarified. Reporter: This morning the FBI facing a major roadblock. They can't open the killer's encrypted smartphone which could hold key evidence. I can assure you we're working very hard to get into the phone and that will continue until we find an answer. I don't know how long that's going to be to be quite honest with you. Reporter: The investigation won't be enough to heal the hearts of the relatives of the 26 killed here in Sutherland springs, Texas, Charlie oh te telling our Matt Gutman she last saw her 16-year-old daughter Haley when she dropped her off at the church. It's the only thing I keep telling myself and I have to try to stay strong. That encrypted phone could contain critical clues in cases like this. Time is of the essence, Michael, with potential evidence sitting right there with police unable to access it. All right, thank you, Pierre.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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