Midwestern farmers consider their vote this year

Following a year of severe weather damage and the COVID-19 pandemic, typically Republican rural residents contemplate their vote in the 2020 election.
2:11 | 10/28/20

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Transcript for Midwestern farmers consider their vote this year
And of course, this evening, a key constituency with the election, America's farmer and the president joking overnight that some people say our farmers do better now than when they actually had a farm. ABC's kayna Whitworth in Iowa tonight, and as we hear from farmers divided on who to vote for. Reporter: Lindsay Larson has been harvesting this land in Iowa for 40 years. In August, he lost half of his corn to a massive storm. I know that we've just gone through one of our worst harvests in 2020, but I'm already starting to make plans for 2021. Reporter: The lifelong Republican farmer, among the crucial base the president won in 2016 and is now relying on to win a second term. The farmers are unbelievable. They're the heart of this nation. Reporter: But U.S. Farmers have been left reeling from the president's trade deals, devastating weather and covid-19. The federal government pumping more than $37 billion in aid to American farmers. In fact, some people say our farmers do better now than they did when they actually had a farm. The aid was far from what the pain was. But the pain sometimes is necessary to get to an agreement where we can feel like we can go forward. Reporter: Supporting trump's trade policies, Larson voted for him again. But the pain across the midwest continues. Wisconsin losing 10% of their darety farms in the last year. Covid cases there surging. I guess I've always wanted to be a farmer. Reporter: In Iowa, Mike holden, a third generation farmer, has already cast his ballot foren. The money that the trump administration then gave to farmers in Iowa to keep them afloat was welcomed but not enough? Yeah. It doesn't make up for the losses we had. It certainly softens a blow. Reporter: The bailouts not enough for him to overlook what he views as failed leadership and lack of civility in the white house. I think he's dangerously reckless. He's brutally insensitive and disrespectful. Reporter: David, vice president Joe Biden plans a visit to Iowa later this week. And the farmers that I spoke with said, no matter what happens, they will still wak up early and they will do their jobs feeding the country. David? Our dedicated farmers. Kayna, thank you.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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