LeBron James' home vandalized with racial slur

"The View" co-hosts discuss the crime, which occurred ahead of Thursday's NBA Finals game.
6:07 | 06/01/17

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Transcript for LeBron James' home vandalized with racial slur
And unfortunately, as Lebron James prepares to play in his seventh straight NBA final, he has to deal with being the victim of racist graffiti scrawled on his home. Here's what he has to say about it. Racism will always be a part of the world, apart of America, and, you know, hate, you know, in America, especially for african-americ African-Americans is living every day. And even though, you know, that it's concealed most of the time, no matter how much money you have, no matter how famous you are, no matter how many people admire you, you know, being black in America is -- it's tough. Yeah. Yeah. So you think this will show how reaching racism still is? You think people don't know? I think there are people that don't know. I have had conversations with people that will say to me, you know, racism is dead. It's a thing of the past, and I say, no, it's not. I hear comments about president obbma, and all the time unfortunately, and I'll hear it, and it bothers me. Sentiment should be it's a thing of the past, but until we acknowledge it's not dead, we won't be able to eradicate it or face it. I give him so much respect to have composure in that moment. To the to have somebody deface you in your home, and remind you of a time where it was okay to say things like that, and to have that composure, I don't know that I would have been able to do what he did. He said, it doesn't matter if you are famous or wealthy. I think it's because he is famous or wealthy. A lot of people that are racism are low-hanging fruit as we say. They are jealous that a black man could achieve that. They did the same thing to president Obama. How dare a black man get to the white house. It's jealousy, and I believe anti-semitism is based on envy and jealousy of a people who achieved so much, and you can't, and so this is how you lash out at these people. It's interesting. I never thought about it that way. I will say for being on this show for season 20, I have received more hate mail calling me the "N" word more than ever in my career. They called you a newsmaker? It's so hurtful, and it's so hateful, and is this a result of the loss of civility we talk about all the time? Racism has been institutional in this country. Let's start with that. Okay? Remember where it started. That's how this began, and so I don't know what it is. It's just what people do, and if you have anything to say, we have now an internet that allows people to say anything they want to you directly. It's interesting to read it. Yeah. Why be hurt by it, sunny? Why not deflect and say, you are stupid? It's hard. When someone hates you because of the color of your skin, something that you cannot control, because of your race, it makes me -- it's scary, and it scares me for the world that my children are inheriting. I'm -- Your children are in this world, baby. A black boy and black girl, and it scares me. As, you know -- A mama. What should happen is you should be explaining to them the foolishness of how this works. I have to. It's my duty. I know. But you being afraid doesn't help. These words are meant to stop you in your tracks. They are meant to stop you. They are meant to make that happen. Those words, young people took that word and said, no more. We're not going for that anymore. We have to let this stuff go so that when somebody calls you one, you turn to one and say, you calling me one? I don't know any. I have never been one. Okay? One thing that was revealing about race to me was I was just watching this Larry bird/magic Johnson, 30 for 30, and in both instanc instances, I found this moment where they were trying to describe this level the people reached. They said, they weren't even black anymore. And I thought, huh? They were saying that people at a time when they were very judgmental about the race of the -- they had to see past the color to appreciate them and honor them, and I remember thinking, what? I had to think about that for a while, and in both instances, that's how they got their point across. They were beyond black. Let me say this, though. It's interesting because I keep on asking myself. Why is it happening so much more at least to me? A southern poverty law center reported its count of hate groups in the country since the election and it has increased for the second consecutive year, and they have also found that progress found since the election, there were a total of 261 documented instances of hate, and 41% of the incidents were connected to the election of trump and against African-Americans. Well, you know, African-Americans, black people and muslims and women, you know, look. Here's the bottom line. No one's going to anywhere. That's true. Americans come in all shapes and sizes, all colors. We're white, we're black, we're yellow. We're red, and none of us are leaving. So either you get with the program and recognize that gay people and straight people and people of all different colors are not leaving this country, the reason people are here is because this is one of the few countries on the face of the Earth where you can be who you are and nobody is going to take

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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