John F. Kennedy Jr.'s chief of staff reflects on his death 20 years later

On the 20th anniversary of the tragic plane crash that claimed Kennedy's life, RoseMarie Terenzio reflects on his legacy and more, live on "GMA."
4:09 | 07/16/19

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Transcript for John F. Kennedy Jr.'s chief of staff reflects on his death 20 years later
We're going to turn to the commemoration of John F. Kennedy jr.'s life today marks 20 years since he, his wife Carolyn and her scissor Lauren was killed off Martha's vineyard. We are looking back at his legacy. They were supposed to be the future of the Kennedy dynasty, John F. Kennedy Jr. And his glamorous wife Carolyn Bessette, John Jr. Born synonymous with fame and the prince of camelot forever remembered as the 3-year-old saluting his father's casket, the late president John F. In the mid '90s John founded and launched "George." It isn't politics as usual. Reporter: A politics meets pop culture magazine with his movie star looks and charm, John dated celebrities like Madonna, Cindy Crawford and Sarah Jessica parker. He finally married Carolyn in 1996. She was a publicist at Calvin Klein and style icon often compared to his late mother Jackie. The couple were married for three years. Updating you on the breaking news, John F. Kennedy Jr. -- Reporter: Before dying in a plane crash over the atlantic on this day in July 1999. And one of John Kennedy jr.'s good friends joins us, Rosemarie terenzio his chief of stat at "George" author of "Fairy tale interrupted, a member ra of life, love and loss." Thanks for being with us. It's hard to believe it's been 20 years since that fateful day. Why do you think people are still so fascinated with John F. Kennedy jr.'s life? Well, I think there are two reason, one, obviously because it was cut short, you know, so soon and I think that there's always been the hope of what could have been. So speaking to that, I mean you knew him so well. What do you think he would have wanted his legacy to be? I think his legacy was "George" magazine. He really believed in, you know, the nonpartisan aspect of it and as we look today, there is a perception that there really isn't a nonpartisan way to get information about politics. Information about politics, what about him becoming a politician? Do you think he would have ended up running for office? I think once "George" was a success he would have thought about -- he talked about running for governor. He didn't go much beyond that but he did say that how many mayors become presidents, though. I guess it was in the back of his mind definitely. That makes a lot of sense and, you know, how do you hope people remember him most? I mean obviously there's his family, there's "George" magazine but what do you want people to know about him. I think the thing that people should know, remember about him and know about him is that he had this tremendous amount of charisma and power and he carried himself with such grace and such dignity and he never abused the power that he had. And speaking to today's political climate and the place we're in, you know, I'm sure it's painful but in a way almost hopeful to imagine what he could have contributed. Have you thought about that? . Yeah, and we actually talk amongst ourselves on the staff about bringing some form of "George" back to life in some way, whether it be a podcast or digitally to keep his legacy going. What did he want for this country? Oh, he wanted great things for this country, but John saw America as the people in it, not some patriotic idealism of America as a thing but as the people in it. And what do you think, what do you think he would say the way -- was he a sage? De have advice? Did he have passion Nall feelings about we should or shouldn't be doing. He did but John was very much in the moment. His motto was nothing is as good or as bad as it seems in the moment and this too shall pass so John was, you know, an optimist but a realist and he lived in the moment. Well, that's something certainly to think about on this day. Rosemarie terenzio, thanks so much for joining us. Thank you. Thanks for having me.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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