Uber faces new allegations about passenger safety

The Washington Post reports the ride-share company allowed drivers to keep picking up passengers even after they were accused of serious wrongdoing.
2:58 | 09/26/19

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Transcript for Uber faces new allegations about passenger safety
Now we'll go to those allegations about safety in Uber. "The Washington post" reporting the company allowed drivers to keep picking up passengers even after they were accused of serious wrongdoing. Paula Faris is here with more. Good morning, Paula. Reporter: Good morning, Michael. That wrongdoing includes theft or even sexual assault by Uber drivers. According to nearly two dozen current and former employees that were interviewed by "The Washington post" they're claiming they've been taught to act in Uber's best interest, not the customer's. What we call a vehicle Reporter: One of the most popular ride-sharing apps in the world but for Uber it hasn't been all smooth sailing. Our caller is an Uber driver stating he just shot a passenger. Uber disclosed how many reports it has received. Reporter: This morning the way Uber internally investigating passenger complaints is under the microscope. Thanks for riding with Uber. Reporter: A new "The Washington post" investigation citing interviews with more than 20 current and former employees alleges that in some cases Uber is putting its own interests ahead of rider safety. Drivers for ride-sharing services like Uber or Lyft are considered independent contractors, not employees. Therefore, the post says those companies generally cannot be held culpable for what occurs during a ride. That includes anything from theft to sexual assault. Riders who have been reporting some of the most serious alleged crimes to the company are sent to the special investigations unit where investigators like former Uber employee Lilli flores would step in. Generally people are receptive to the kind of feedback that have you about suspected offenders as far as if they should stay on the application or not. Reporter: Flores says she spent two years with the company before leaving last November in part because of the number of sexual assault cases that she had to field. I'm talking about sexual assault all day every day and it's not easy. Reporter: The post also reports that investigators were told not to report purported crimes to police for fear of being fired or reprimanded which Uber denies. It was our job to, you know, just take the report for what it was and not hand that off to police. Reporter: Uber disputes "The post" reporting telling ABC news the special investigative unit was created not to shelter us from legal liability but to provide specialized customer support. The power of reporting should always remain with the victim. We support the victim and allowing them to choose when and if they want to support or go to police and report. Now, a month ago Uber introduced a new policy where they will ask the alleged victim if they should contact law enforcement on their behalf but Uber makes business decision, not law enforcement decision, however, investigators will point out by not reporting these alleged crimes these bad drivers are allowed to stay on the street and can go to another ride-sharing app and definitely gives you pause. Certainly does. Thank you.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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