Young Americans contribute to rise in cases

Though young people aren’t the only ones ignoring the rules, a question remains: Are people getting the message about COVID-19 dangers, or choosing to believe they are not at risk?
2:23 | 07/05/20

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Transcript for Young Americans contribute to rise in cases
We're now seeing younger Americans making up more of the new covid-19 cases, raising questions about whether they're getting the social distancing message or choosing to ignore it. ABC's zohreen shah with a closer look. Coming to America Reporter: As America celebrates fourth of July weekend, many fearing young people will send coronavirus cases soaring after celebrations like these. In Minnesota's lake minnetonka, partygoers seen partying close together on boats. In lake James, Indiana, close quarters gathers continued with beachgoers packing sand bars. According to experts, younger Americans have been driving up the case count. The overwhelming majority of people getting infected are young people. Reporter: This took -- Tuscaloosa, Alabama, tracking a dangerous trend, coronavirus parties where they say students compete to catch the virus. Kids are kids. And kids do stupid things. You know, this is one of them. Reporter: At the university of Washington, Seattle's campus, dozens of students living in fraternity houses testing positive. Everyone I live with is taking extra precautions. We're getting tested this week. Reporter: Officials are concerned with young people hitting the road this summer they could take the virus along with them. Traveling from West Virginia and Virginia, all testing positive for the virus when they returned home. If I were you, I would consider going somewhere else. Reporter: As cases among students continue to rise, many colleges and universities are re-thinking their plans for the fall. Our Tom llamas asking the university of Arizona's president I many what it would take for them to close again. Of all the questions, that's the question that keeps me up at night. It wakes me up frequently at night. When is this experiment gone so wrong that we have to stop it? Reporter: Their president may have recently now answered that question. If I had to say today would we open? No. Reporter: Just a few days ago, a Penn state student died from the virus, he was only 21 years old. Doctors want to remind people this virus can be deadly. Regardless of how old you are. And it's not just young people ignoring the rules when it comes to coronavirus. All important points, zohreen.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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