Pandemic hits minorities at disproportional and alarming rate

Twin doctors from Philadelphia, Dr. Delana Wardlaw and Dr. Elana McDonald, made it their mission to make free testing available to the communities most in need.
3:57 | 05/12/20

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Transcript for Pandemic hits minorities at disproportional and alarming rate
This pandemic has hit minorities, mostly African-Americans, at an alarming rate. Twin doctors in Philadelphia have made it their mission to bring free testing into communities most in need. They're joining us now. Thank you both for being with us. We certainly appreciate it. And we know that for so many years, both of you have been fighting health care disparities in your city. Because this is not a new issue. It's just the pandemic shining a light on it. Tell us about what your community has been facing. So, our community has been facing a disproportionate rates of coronavirus. Unfortunately the access to testing hasn't been adequate. Patients are faced with healthcare disparities, where they don't have access -- many don't have access to a regular primary care doctor and with that, they are not able to have their chronic illnesses well controlled in many instances, and they're not able to have their medications followed up and adjusted as necessary. When these chronic illnesses aren't well controlled, we know that has a significant effect on people's rate of survival from coronavirus. And so the two of you are stepping in, providing a remedy, free testing to be specific, in a mobile unit. Tell us how it works and how people most importantly can get access to it. So, the mobile unit was created -- it was the idea of a medical school colleague of ours, Dr. Stanford, we were approached by her to help participate in the program and it was a no-brainer for us and the purpose of the program is to provide testing without the barriers. Lot of testing sites require you to have a prescription from a physician, you had to be over a certain age, within the health care industry, or you had to have a car to do the drive-up testing. The purpose of the mobile site was to remove barriers for persons who were experiencing symptoms and needed to get the testing done. That's remarkable. You're removing those barriers. But what do you think the local governments need to do more better to make sure that they're also supplementing what y'all are trying to accomplish? Local government needs to provide increased funding to allow access to testing for everyone. In the most vulnerable areas and areas that are affected and testing in every area, everyone who had symptoms and been exposed and exposed to the coronavirus should have the ability to get tested. We know that there are plenty of people have easy access to testing, others have found it quite difficult to get a test. Local government can fund testing to allow those testing sites to be available to everyone, that will make it a much easier feat for people to get this testing done. And how the coronavirus is affecting the country. Is there anything the public can do right now to help you two keep this going and just tell us what you need. Well, one of our main messages is that we want the public to continue to do the things that the CDC has recommended in order to prevent the spread of the virus. We want you to continue to stay at home, only go out if you have to absolutely for essentials. If you have to go out, wear your mask properly, over your mouth and your nose. Social distance from people six feet. If you're outside your home, continue to wash your hands as frequently as possible. We appreciate you joining us today. Thank you so much. Thank you very much. And coming up next here on international nurses day, the

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