NASA astronaut 'confident' flying aboard Russian Soyuz despite recent failed mission

Army Lt. Col. Anne McClain is preparing for her six-month mission to the International Space Station at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia.
2:41 | 11/09/18

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Transcript for NASA astronaut 'confident' flying aboard Russian Soyuz despite recent failed mission
930000. Pounds of threats just weeks after that so use booster failed and a crew was rocketed to safety. The Russians are ready to return to manned flight and this American astronaut will be the first to sit atop that rockets since the accident. For her first flight the space is she confident. I'm David Berlin let's get you up to speed. The Russians say it was a manufacturing defense of a sensor that caused its personal use failure in decades. The escape system returning astronaut nick K and his cosmonaut crewmates safely to earth. Now army lieutenant colonel and the plane is ready to be one of the first to climb back aboard the store US. We spoke to her from the Russian space port you are going to be the first American to strapped bond to this Soyuz rockets since the explosion and failure I feeling about. The bottom line is that I would have got a solid rocket the next day. I know that a lot of people see that as a de villiers often called that but inside does he mean anywhere we we mitigate risk professionally. Every single day and that was a success story I didn't have confidence. Would now be seen your credit have confidence in this racket and assistance. But playing an army helicopter pilot joined the astronaut corps five years ago now ready to head to space for the first time. Having told her parents at the age of three or four she wanted to be an astronaut. I don't know what struck me at that age in a defiant but I do know that it has been something so magical that has given me such purpose. It you know my whole life and American fortitude to achieving what. Are you most excited about what are you thinking in your head he is. The experience if you look at his opponent is that the liftoff visit zero G what what are you looking for. I think quality. You know this is not experience that you can't really have an analog foreign trained perfectly on the ground. And so they be you know feeling the stress of the rocket is an NBA something that I am I'm really looking forward to why space what tickled your imagination about space. I think that you know for as long as there's mankind has existed without a propensity to explore. And we will let go across lands go across the water. And then the next logical step was to start flying. Down just over a hundred years ago and of course never a look at the stars and and say what's next what's out there. But planes blast off scheduled for December 3 he'll spend six months in the International Space Station. I'm David Curley and now you're up to speed.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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