ALS patient rides motorcycle after being unable to for over 2 years: Part 2

Thurman Maynard sold his motocross bike two years ago after his diagnosis. He says he's regained skills he thought he'd lost forever, since he began participating in a cutting-edge stem cell trial.
6:01 | 08/09/19

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Transcript for ALS patient rides motorcycle after being unable to for over 2 years: Part 2
My dad's name is? My favorite thing to do with my dad is? Reporter: Most ahs patients are given two to five years to live, but Pete is still fighting. Costly, round the clock care keeping him alive. His legacy, Lucy. When my mom dumped water on her head when she had a black dress on, I was actually there. Reporter: Promising new treatments may not make a difference in his battle, but the family is still focussed on the future. This will go back to Pete and the ice bucket challenge. For being the beginning of the end of that disease. Reporter: The solution may already be coursing through Thurmond's body. He was your typical sports buff who married his school sweetheart. I was playing football. She was a cheer leader. Enough said. Reporter: Game over. Reporter: They bonded over their who have of riding dirt bikes. Their two teenagers who have to ride as well. A family that rides together stays together I guess? Yes. Reporter: Why does he who have it so much? ? The freedom. Couldn't pull it in, couldn't shift gears. It was like a snowball effect. Reporter: He received that dreaded diagnosis, als. I was stupid about the disease. I didn't know nothing about it. Reporter: What went through your behind? Reporter: With Thurmond unable to work, the couple sold their home and that prized dirt bike. How desperate were you to find some hope? I called several of the hospitals and nobody reached back out to me. And out of the blue, an icon popped up on my cell phone, it had a phone number, I clicked it and called it. Reporter: That's good spam. That's awesome. Reporter: Thurmond's Poe Greg is relatively slow. Making him a perfect candidate for the stem cell trial in Boston. So they decided to make the long commute. The treatment involves removing a patient's own stem cells and treating them. He is one of 130,000 people chosen. Nobody knows is Thurmond is actually getting his own enriched stem cells or a placebo. You're convinced that you're not on the placebo. I'm not convinced. I feel strength back in my body. Of course my left hand. Reporter: Is it the power of placebo? If you're injecting water in my spine, say continue. I feel great. Reporter: Dozens of stem cell trials have all failed to provide a treatment, but Thurmond's trial is already attracting attention, in part due to this video, als activist Matt balima, that's him rising from his wheelchair for the first time in two years and months later, this, taking the he's the only patient getting the treatment outside of a chinical trial. He fought for access to try. Just yesterday, a patient advocacy group reported a groundbreaking meeting with brainstorm's team and the fda. Als patients clamoring for speedy access to treatment. We've seen cases where people got better very quickly, but we don't know enough to say that they actually stayed better. So promising is the best we can say at this point. Reporter: Back home in west Virginia, Thurmond is convinced he's regaining thought he'd lost forever. Before, I wasn't able to use my left hand. Now. Reporter: It's working pretty well. Pretty simple to use. Reporter: Something essentially unheard of in the Reporter: That's a small gesture but a huge meaning. Yes. Reporter: But today, a bold decision, attempting to get back on a dirt bike for the first time in over two years. Today's going to be the firth day. Reporter: Today's the day. There's an old saying among motorcycle riders. Four-wheels move the body. Two wheels move the soul. How's it feel? What does that mean? Speechless. Almost like having a newborn baby. Reporter: You're giddy right Yeah. Reporter: In your mind, you felt like you'd never ride again. I never thought I'd have this moment right here, ever again. Reporter: Today the joyride of lifetime. It may seem like a small thrill but a towering act of defiance in a disease that stands undefeated. I don't want do be foolishly optimistic, but do you think it's the stem cells doing it? If it's not, it's got me fooled.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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