Bella Thorne opens up about pansexuality, overcoming abuse and dyslexia

Thorne, 21, speaks openly in her new book about her struggles with self-acceptance, being bullied for her dyslexia and sexual abuse.
5:29 | 07/23/19

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Transcript for Bella Thorne opens up about pansexuality, overcoming abuse and dyslexia
I like sexy. I love skin. Like I love seeing skin. I like -- like I like sexy. I like sexy girls. I like sexy guys. I like sexy in general. You know. Reporter: This is Bella Thorne. I don't need no I.D. 'Cause I'm Bella Thorne the former Disney star unfiltered, unafraid to speak her mind. World is going to see my boobies, then it's going to be my choice! Reporter: That bold declaration sent to ABC news this weekend in response to a hacker's blackmail attempt. Why I leaked my own nudes. Because I felt really taken advantage of. Reporter: Threatening to leak her private photos. What really makes me uncomfortable about somebody having these photos of me, and it was that it's not my choice to give it to them. That that was really the most -- the most Up part that just made me feel seriously uncomfortable. Reporter: Tweeting "For too long I let a man take advantage of me over and over and I'm expletive sick of it." How did you become such a rebel? I think a lot of wanting to know my father. He was a rebel are and quite crazy and out there and did a lot of -- ooh. Reporter: Bella's father died in a motorcycle crash when she was 9. How did your father's death affect not just your family but you? Questions that I'll never have answers to. The constant seeking of acceptance that I'll never have. The constant need for affection that I'll never get. And so I think that's probably where my rebellion comes from. Reporter: The emptiness following his death described in her latest book, part poetry, part stream of consciousness. "The life of a wannabe mogul: Mental disarray." What's the real Bella Thorne? She's me. She's like that girl in that book. She's just like, you know, sitting right here. She's in a lot of pain, this girl in this book. Yes. I would say so. She talks about depression. Yeah. There's a lot of In that book. It's out there. It's very -- it's very -- I just say it like it is. Reporter: It's a far cry from her wholesome Disney days at 13 dancing opposite zendaya on the hit show "Shake it up." Shake it up I doubt you know how to teach dyslexics. Who's dyslexic? CICI. How did you know that? Reporter: Her character CICI Jones mirroring Bella's real-life struggle with dyslexia, which her book makes no attempt to hide. How does someone who's dyslexic become this wide-ranging author? You know, I couldn't read, and I learned how to read from reading scripts. You shared about being bullied because of your dyslexia. Mm-hmm. What was that like growing up? Bullying is not fun. It's a lot of insecurities that you gain from all of that. Reporter: She said she was also bullied for speaking Spanish. Growing up cuban-american, just one of many painful chapters that shaped who she is today. Was it because I was molested my whole life? Exposed to sex at such a young age that feels the most natural to offer the world. Or is it because I was raised to think I wasn't good enough? Reporter: The abuse lasted, she says, through till adolescence. How did the young you perceive what was happening? Definitely Stockholm syndrome. Oh, yeah. For sure. I mean, when you're raised with someone and you don't know that it's wrong, it's just very like -- an everyday occurrence like no big deal. And so that's kind of how I treated it, like no big deal. Some survivors I've interviewed have told me that they have anger toward the adults who couldn't protect them. I think that you have anger towards society in general. This is something that has literally happened at everyone's doorstep. Reporter: Thorne explains the reasoning why so many victims of sexual abuse remain silent. I don't want to convince someone of my tragedies. Because society makes our victims feel like villains. And therefore the girl never walks into the police station and really tells the story. Reporter: 20 million fans follow her every move on Instagram. Her life now an open book. Do you feel pressure to put out a certain view, image of yourself? 100%, yeah. I think as we all do, you know, Instagram is our worst mask of ourselves. What I love is you make what other people would regards as big announcements in a no big deal way. Chill way. Confirming your bisexuality. In a twe realized recently I'm actually a pansexual. And I didn't know that. Okay. Somebody explained to me thoroughly what that is. Explain that to me. Because -- I am pan. You like beings. You like what you like. It doesn't have to be a girl or a guy or, you know, a he, a she, a they, a this, or that. It's literally you like you just like a being. Reporter: Perhaps that's the real Bella Thorne. Fearless, unapologetic, and always ready for the next chapter. You're a writer. You're an actor. You're a dancer. You're a singer. What do you want to focus on moving forward? I'm doing a lot of writing. Writing and direct. That's definitely what I feel most happy when I do. So I think I have to go more toward that because I like being happy.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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