Coming out to head of Chechen police, a force accused of brutal ‘gay purge’: Part 2

“Nightline” gained rare access to a Chechen prison with the republic’s head of police, General Apti Alaudinov. ABC News’ James Longman revealed to Alaudinov that he is gay while at the prison.
7:00 | 10/25/19

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Transcript for Coming out to head of Chechen police, a force accused of brutal ‘gay purge’: Part 2
chechnya, wit the head of a police force accused of rounding up and torturing hundreds of gay what do we know about this place? I don't know. Reporter: So this is it. This is a police station just outside of grosny, escorted by the police chief himself. Keep it rolling, James. Reporter: On the parade ground, a rehearsed demonstration of power. 58 kalashnikovs ready at a moment's notice. So the police chief has come here. So that's why, automatically. He gave the order that they come out. Half the activities of these men or men like them have been scrutinized by the United States and others. Translator: Every goddamn day, there's a shooting. Reporter: That's what you would say to human rights campaigners who say that these men and men like them are responsible for atrocities? Translator: There are 10,500 police men here. Can you show me one state in the world where there's a policeman who hasn't committed some kind of crime? You may not like us, no one can disagree with us, that we are able to keep order in the republic. Reporter: Can we take a look inside? Ive reported around the world as a gay man, but so far here I've kept it to myself. I may tell him, guys. So I have a question for you. What if I told you that I was gay? What if I told you that I was gay? Reporter: So it doesn't upset you for me to tell you that I'm gay? I'm not going to be in trouble. You're not going to lock me in this cell? Because I'll be very honest, I'm scared to tell you that I'm gay. Do you understand why I'm scared? Reporter: Feel my heart. Reporter: I'm scared. This is not the reaction you'd expect. And on my face, a nervous smile. [ Speaking in foreign language) . Reporter: The stories we've heard from young chechen gay men, though, that they feel scared to be gay in their own country. Reporter: A surreal moment, but for the general, an amusing one full of smiles, but perhaps also an attempt to whitewash. I feel very strange at this point. I think I just came out to the head of chechnya's head of the police force in a prison cell. But I think on some level it's important to prove a point that gay people might not be what they expect. But I think there's different rules for different people. And because I'm foreign, somehow it doesn't matter. But, if I were chechen, that would be a threat. Reporter: What's important is I don't want to make this about me. This is about the people that we've spoken to and the many dozens who allege crimes going on here. Reporter: You've been very welcoming. You've shown us around. Do you less of a man than you? Reporter: You wouldn't like me to be my friend. Reporter: Fighting is a way of life for chechen men. It defines who they are. Like gladiators, chechens assemble to celebrate their masculinity. In the middle of it all, their emperor. Remind me, there's a whole area of raised seating where he sits, we have to be careful not to point our cameras at it too behind us is a whole row of young boys waving flags with his picture on it. I can't shake the feeling that it feels like a cult. His chechnya is a world of patriotic masculinity, where displays of bravery somehow prove your worth. In this place, anything foreign must be defeated. Like homosexuality, a western illness and a threat to the nation. These men have shown a deeper bravery, but their courage is not recognized. I had the dreams always, and I was believing even there I was that I deserve better life. And it's all happening now. Somehow.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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