George H.W. Bush, in his own words, reflects on his presidency, family

In previous ABC News interviews with Barbara Walters and Diane Sawyer, the 41st president spoke about his political life and his sons, George and Jeb.
5:19 | 12/06/18

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Transcript for George H.W. Bush, in his own words, reflects on his presidency, family
Mr. Bush, by the time this interview is aired, you will be president of the United States. As I say it what do you feel? Has it sunk in yet? It has. It doesn't have the dramatic feeling I thought it might have. But I am -- I want to go and try to do my best. Would you describe George Bush for us? Very warm. Very wise. Very caring. I would put faith as a very important part of George's life. Family. And friends. Mr. President, what is your vision for this country? Well, my vision is partially achieved. My passion is about a world at peace. I think because of what we've been able to do with the soviet union and now Russia, and because of what we were able to do in "Desert storm," world peace is better enhanced, better secured, you might say. Now my vision is to see an educated country, a country that wins the battle against crime and drugs, that is fighting every American family. What's the biggest misconception about George Bush? Well, first of all, I can think of 10 misconceptions. He's considerably taller than people think he is. People say to us, oh, you're so much taller than we thought. He's full of energy. He's the most decent, honest person. Wow. I shouldn't say that in front of him, should I? And very funny. Not just funny-looking. I mean, very funny. How does it feel sitting here now and thinking of a life spent in government and politics? You know, people always ask the question a little differently, what's it feel like going from being president one day to out of it? And it's not difficult at all. You don't think he's sitting home. He went to 24 foreign countries last year, for starters. You can do things that you want to do, stay in touch with the things you want to. Stay out of politics, out of advising our sons. But you really can stay out of giving advice? Uh-huh. Yeah. Well, some of us can't. No, we talk regularly, George and Jeb and I, that I would not gratuitously offer advice. I know what their heartbeat is and they got to do their own thing. Both of them are. Both of them have their own program. One for Florida, one for Texas. For George, maybe more. So they know what I've tried to do and where I've succeeded and where I've failed. There would be nothing worse than a father who got defeated running for his second term for president trying to make something, be something through his son. I shouldn't be hovering, trying to be something more. We've done it. We're letting his torians decide the good and the bad. So when you look out of this scene, what do you see? I see the power of the sea. I see the wonders of the sea. I see my boat. I love going in a boat. I just feel totally relaxed here in Maine by the coast. Is it a good time? In life? Yeah. It is a good time. And Barbara makes a lot of that for us. And the family, family means everything to me. Is there something you always want to make sure that you say to them, make sure that they know? Even that you now have great grandchildren. Well, just that we love them. I think they know that. A little great granddaughter here on the point right now. A beautiful little girl. And I have a little worry that I won't be around to see her grow much older. But it's not a fearsome thing, it's not a worry in the sense of feeling cheated out of something. I don't know where I'd be in life if I wasn't blessed with a lot of kids and grandkids and family, including, of course, Barbara. I mean, very lucky. And friendship. Family and friends. Even though you grew up in a very comfortable life, there was always a sense of responsibility to the rest of the world. Well, there should be. We've been given a lot of material things. We've been very blessed when you look around compared to the life of others, how lucky we've been. You must feel responsibility to others. You must believe in serving others. I think that's a fundamental tenet of my life. You've always been an O be. And I am an optimist about life, about everything that lies ahead. I do think there's an afterlife. I do think that you go to heaven, there is a heaven. I don't fear it. When I was a little guy, I feared death. I'd worry about it, be scared. Not anymore.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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