Latinx trans woman talks about her horrific assault to send a message: Part 2

Amber Nicole Herenandez, 23, was beaten so badly in April that her jaw was fractured in three places and had to be wired shut for a month. She decided to add her voice to a chorus of other activists.
7:11 | 10/04/19

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Transcript for Latinx trans woman talks about her horrific assault to send a message: Part 2
Reporter: It's one in the morning, downtown Denver. On this busy street, after a night of drinking, and stumbling out of a bar, amber Nicole is terrified for her life. So I have my friend recording this just in case anything happens, if I get jumped, and my friends car gets attacked I just want everybody to know its because of these boys who are attacking us. Keep recording, keep recording. I felt like we weren't safe. I had to get help. Reporter: That's when she's beaten. She says multiple times. Somehow staggering back into frame. Oh, my god, somebody hurt you, babe. I'll bleeding, I'm bleeding so bad. Call the cops! Engine six, respond to a party bleeding at 14th St. And market St. Reporter: Amber is rushed to her jaw shattered. All her mother juls Martinez can do is bear witness to her daughter's pain. My worst fear was here. Like, "Is she okay? Is she breathing? Is she alive?" So what's the first memory that you do have? Waking up. I had so much blood in my mouth and my throat, all over. This wasn't just some black eye. It wasn't some scrapes and bruises. This is someone's child. This is a human being. This is a beautiful young woman. Reporter: Her jaw, wired shut for a month. But she says, she wanted the world to see her wounds. I felt like I was being choked and then I realized it was from the pressure of my jaw resting on my neck because it was dislocated. Just in case if anything happens. When you look back at the video of that night that you recorded, what goes through your It terrifies me. I hear the fear in my voice, just knowing that I knew something was coming. And did anyone stop to help you? Nobody stopped. Reporter: To this day there's been no arrest. Three months after the attack, she's going back to the hospital. What's the news you're hoping for today? I'm hoping that the plates are removable. I'm hoping that everything has healed the way that it needs to and that in the future I can get constructive surgery. Reporter: Her jaw is still held together by metal plates. Her bones have yet to fully heal. What was your reaction when you saw the x-ray? It takes me back. I've been jumped. I've been assaulted. Reporter: She's one of the lucky ones. Amber Nicole's near death experience, she says, has empowered her to speak in honor of her fallen sisters. Ashanti. Joining, activists like Monica Roberts, who says it all starts by saying their names. It is important to be respected in death, but by doing that respectful coverage it helps. Reporter: For 13 years, her blog trans griot, an homage to African storytelling, has made it a mission to correct every news article and police report that misgenders trans women. I wanted to role model what a story looked like to the media that respectfully covered trans folks. Reporter: Only then, she says, can the tragic stories of these women enter the mainstream consciousness. Clara logato, Brooklyn, muhlaysia booker. Her voice, joining a chorus of activists and allies. She was married to Kristy Clara logato. Muhlaysia booker. Say her name! While their lives were cut short, their memories will live on. We do not talk enough about trans Americans. We're queer, we're fabulous, and we're staying here. We no longer have a voice on this Earth, but let's give that to them by saying their names, saying what happened to them and speaking out about it. Reporter: Serving as inspiration, for a community too often forced to ask, "Am I next?" Things are getting clearer, yeah I feel free to bare my skin yeah that's all me. Nothing and me go hand in hand nothing on my skin that's my new plan. Nothing is Everything. Keep your skin clearer with skyrizi. 3 out of 4 people achieved 90% clearer skin at 4 months. Of those, nearly 9 out of 10 sustained it through 1 year. And skyrizi is 4 doses a year, after 2 starter doses. I see nothing in a different way and it's my moment so I just gotta say Nothing is Everything skyrizi may increase your risk of infections and lower your ability to fight them. Before treatment your doctor should check you for infections and tuberculosis. Tell your doctor if you have an infection S such as fevers, sweats, chills, muscle aches or coughs, or if you plan to or recently received a vaccine. Nothing is Everything Ask your dermatologist about skyrizi. No matter how much you clean, does your house still smell stuffy? That's because your home is filled with soft surfaces that trap odors and release them back into the room. So, try Febreze Fabric Refresher

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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