By the numbers: Slavery and Juneteenth

As lawmakers consider making Juneteenth a federal holiday, a look at some key numbers and dates.
1:18 | 06/20/20

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Transcript for By the numbers: Slavery and Juneteenth
On this day of reflection we look at the history of slavery United States and what today June 19 means by the numbers. Beginning in the sixteenth century an estimated ten point seven million black men women and children were transported. From West Africa and sold into slavery in the Americas. Nearly two million more are estimated to have died during the brutal voyage. By 1860 in the fifteen southern states that still permitted slavery nearly one in four families owned slaves. In 1863. President Abraham Lincoln signed the emancipation proclamation to care declaring all slaves free. But more than two years later on June 191865. And union general Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston Texas to announce that slavery had ended. At that time more than 250000. Black people were in flames in Texas. And did not know that by law they should have already been free. Texans began celebrating June 18 a year later an 1866. And now 47 states recognize June team. As a holiday or observance. But today senate Democrats announced a plan to make it a federal holiday if they prove successful June teens would be the first new federal holiday since Martin Luther King Day was recognized. In 1983.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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