Brazil's air force deployed tankers to drop water on the Amazon as it burns

Villagers in the area are helping to stop the fire by dousing hotspots with buckets.
2:05 | 08/25/19

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Transcript for Brazil's air force deployed tankers to drop water on the Amazon as it burns
We move to the global crisis, the Amazon in flames as the world watches. Massive wildfires sweeping across the rain forest, covering an area the equivalent of Detroit to Los Angeles. And 44,000 members of the Brazilian military called in as reinforcements. Here's Matt Gutman, in the fire zone. Reporter: Those images tonight, apocalyptic. The Amazon on fire. Brazil's air force deploying c-130 tankers streaming out 3,000 gallons per drop. And the Bolivian government contracting this u.s.-based 747 supertanker, capable of carrying 19,000 gallons of those assets, including 44,000 Brazilian troops sent to the fire line. Miniscule, given the scale of fires erupting across this region. In Brazil alone, about 80,000 fires have burned, many caused by farmers leveling a record amount of forest. The Amazon producing 20% of the world's oxygen. We saw it from the air. I've been covering fires for years now. I've never seen burn scars like this. And on the ground. Joining members of the corumba fire brigade, 30 men covering an area twice the size of New Jersey. The tools they have are pretty rudimentary. You can see they have these -- they look like floor mats in cars and they are using sticks to slap down the fire. No fire trucks, no hoses. Sometimes just kicking the fire. And then through a curtain of fire, this man appeared. He said his name is Jefferson and that he first reported the fire. At first, attacking it by himself. He is showing us how he was putting out the fires. The fire burning the shirt off his back. But he stayed, as did those weary firefighters. They were out there for 29 consecutive hours. No radios, no fire trucks, no help. The U.S. And other governments have offered assistance, but so far, the Brazilian president says he doesn't need any.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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