FAA administrator on the hot seat

Stephen Dickson, head of the Federal Aviation Administration, is pushing back against the notion 737 Max crashes reveal that something is broken with the aircraft certification process.
0:24 | 12/12/19

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Transcript for FAA administrator on the hot seat
There are new questions tonight about whether the FAA did enough after the first Boeing 737 Max jet crash. FAA administrator Stephen Dixon on the hot seat today over the agency's own report after that first crash but found at the MCAS flight control software was not corrected. There could be as many as fifteen fatal crashes over the life of the fleet. Five months later as you remembered Ethiopian airlines flight crashed killing 157.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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