Legendary Singer Sting Set to Receive Kennedy Center Honor

Famed musician talks to David Muir about standing up for American jobs.
2:55 | 09/13/14

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Transcript for Legendary Singer Sting Set to Receive Kennedy Center Honor
Finally tonight, here, our person of the week. The legendary singer who will receive a Kennedy center honor. Why he's standing up for American jobs. And he's not leaving any of his millions to his children? Is that true? Our person of the week. Reporter: 42nd street here in New York. And we were invited through the doors, up the elevator. The music already bleeding through the doors. ? and on the other side of that piano, sting. Composing and now watching his very first musical. But it was sting who had the first question. When does it become official? You're not officially person of the week until it airs. You can't claim -- So, I'm pre-person of the week. Reporter: We watch the rehearsal with him. How does it feel to you? Pretty good, except I'm not singing. Reporter: But we all know that voice. ? Every breath you take ? Reporter: 100 million records sold. 16 grammys. And tonight, his musical, "The last ship." Influenced by the town he grew up in. His mother, a hairdresser. His father, a milkman. And he would work every day of the week? He would work seven days a week. Reporter: Did that leave an impression on you? It gave me a work ethic. Reporter: Many folks would never know that it was your mother who would play Broadway music in the house. I was educated by my mom's record collection. All of the Rodgers and hammerstein collection. And so I ate those records for breakfast. Reporter: Was there a particular show you remember best? "Carousel" is probably my favorite. Followed by "Oklahoma." ? Reporter: And now, his musical. About workers in a town who lost jobs, but not their spirit. We need to work. We need to make things. Otherwise, we're just sitting with our little devices, tweeting. Reporter: And we ask about his wife of more than 20 years. You told me when Trudie walks into the room, your world lights up. She's my sunshine and my oxygen. Absolutely. Reporter: "Every breath you take." Everyone think this is, like, a great romantic song. I think it is a great romantic song. But it's also on the other side quite a dark song. There's an element of surveillance in it, you know, I'll be watching you forever. That's not entirely healthy. ? I'll be watching you ? Reporter: And about that new headline. Sting saying he would not leave his money to his children. Is it true that you plan on leaving them none of your material wealth? It's actually, it's never been an issue with my kids. My kids have inherited my work ethic. It's a privilege to actually make your own money. And we need that. And that generation needs that, too.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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