3 million left in the dark after storm hits Northeast

Tropical Storm Isaias brought wind gusts of over a 100 mph, knocking down traffic lights, trees and power lines and a million people in New Jersey are without power.
2:34 | 08/04/20

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Transcript for 3 million left in the dark after storm hits Northeast
Of course, all of this playing out as hospitals treat patients in this pandemic and now millions are without power as we head into the night. And right here this evening, the moment, the explosion from downed power lines in the middle of our reporter's interview, illustrating the danger as we head into the night. Stephanie Ramos from New Jersey. Reporter: Hurricane Isaias spawned waterspouts along the Jersey shore and brought with it wind guch gusts over 100 miles an hour. We started feeling it in cape may, New Jersey, just after. That washing machine feeling, that's basically what we are in right now. It actually just calmed down in the last five seconds. But the wind, the rain, the sand, just really whipping around. Those winds knocking down traffic lights, trees and power lines, putting more than 3 million in the dark across the storm zone. More than a million just in New Jersey. Should you have to go out and come across a downed power line, please immediately report it to emergency services. Reporter: Someone reported this sparking line. And while we were interviewing emergency manager Jerry inderwies, it exploded. No one was hurt. This is basically a result of the storm, power lines down, causing fires and explosions in the neighborhood. That's correct. That's correct. You saw what can happen. Reporter: Tonight, hospitals up and down the storm zone that were dealing with coronavirus are now dealing with this storm, too. These coastal communities no stranger to powerful storms. And all kinds of weather emergencies. But this time, it's different. To say this is not an easy endeavor in the midst of a pandemic would be the understatement of the day. Reporter: David, the city manager tells us electrical teams were delayed in getting to this area because of damage across this region. The governor of New Jersey says that is the challenge, they're seeing all over the state. These crews will be here through the night and into tomorrow until power is fully restored. David? All right, we're just glad you were standing a distance from those power lines. A good reminder for everyone as we head into the night. Stephanie, thank you. Of course, this storm is still on the move at this hour, so, let's get to chief meteorologist ginger zee with the late track. Reporter: That storm just raced up the east coast, so fast today. I want to take you straight to the map, because there are still tornado watches out for parts of new England. You can see some of the moisture that has now moved almost to the Canadian border. That's going to be gone, but the winds are still gusting behind it, anywhere from 30 to 60 miles per hour. So, you're still going to have that from Boston up through Massachusetts, into upstate new York. We're going to be keeping an eye on that. And the timing of it all, we're going to say good-bye to Isaias by tomorrow. David? Ginger, thank you. There are awful images

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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