Study provides data about COVID-19 patients

The study looked at 5,700 sick patients and found that nearly 57% were already struggling with high blood pressure.
2:05 | 04/23/20

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Transcript for Study provides data about COVID-19 patients
In the meantime, the first large story in the U.S. Revealing which covid-19 patients are hardest hit. Researchers discovering men in every age group dying more than women. What the data shows about patients with high blood pressure, obesity, and diabetes. Here's Steve osunsami. Reporter: American doctors are getting good information tonight on who is hurt the most after getting sick with the coronavirus. And it's patients like Shaun Evans in suburban Atlanta. He's a diabetic, and after coming down with covid-19, he now needs a new kidney and regular dialysis. Just so people know, this is kind of the way I take dialysis right now. This is a port in my chest that goes directly to my heart. Reporter: The study published today looked at 5,700 sick patients, and found that nearly 57% were already struggling with high blood pressure. Nearly 42% were dealing with obesity. And nearly 34% were diabetic. They also found that men were more likely to die. Harold Jenkins came close to dying in a south Georgia hospital, and was on a ventilator in the icu. He is also diabetic. I've seen a lot of things. I'm a Vietnam veteran, you I'm a Vietnam veteran, you know. I've done a lot of things. This pandemic is something else. Reporter: Scientists believe that covid-19 targets blood vessels, so patients with pulmonary damage from high blood pressure, for example, could suffer more. There was hope that hydroxychloroquine may help treat sick patients. But what's showing promise are blood plasma infusions from people who've already beaten the virus, and a drug called remdesivir which was originally made to treat ebola. Chris Kane said the drug saved his life. I think remdesivir gave it the extra jump start it needed to turn the corner. Reporter: While the final results of trials are not in, early results are positive. Steve, thank you.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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