New York City delays opening public schools to avoid teachers’ strike

Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Tuesday that the start of the school year in New York City would be delayed until Sept. 21 to avoid a teachers’ strike over COVID-19 safety demands.
3:48 | 09/01/20

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Transcript for New York City delays opening public schools to avoid teachers’ strike
Tonight's other major headline, the coronavirus pandemic forcing the largest public school system in America to delay the start of the school year. New York City bowing to concerns from the teacher's union. The U.S. Now with more than 184,000 lives lost. Tonight, a new warning from Dr. Anthony Fauci about labor day weekend and the days that follow. And his response when asked if president trump still trusts him. Here's ABC's Eva pilgrim. Reporter: Just days before a return to school for more than a million children in New York City, classes delayed until September 21st to avoid a teacher's strike over covid safety demands. We've heard from everyone in our schools that have said we need some more time. Reporter: Parents say they just want their kids to be safe. That has to be my first concern, is the safety of my that has to be. I have no other choice. Safety comes first and so I'm going to put my trust in them. Reporter: We recently got a look at preparations at New York's ps-532. Disinfection, spaced desks and open windows. Principal kevyn Bowles telling Tom, they'd be ready. Obviously, I take the safety of everybody in my community really seriously, and in spite of my confidence in this plan, there is, of course, the reality that this is a scary and unknown virus. Reporter: New York City schools now agreeing to randomly test students and staff each month. The federal government set to ship 150 million rapid tests to states to be used in the reopening of schools. The president again appearing to take issue with Dr. Anthony Fauci. I get along with him but every once in a while he'll come up with one that I say, where did that come from? I inherited him. He was here, he was a part of this huge piece of machinery. I didn't put anybody in charge. He was here. Reporter: The nation's top infectious disease doctor brushing it off, saying he believes the president trusts his advice. I think that's kind of a distraction to pit me against the president. We're all on the same team. Reporter: But Fauci once again finding himself at odds with the president, firmly dismissing a claim trump retweeted suggesting the death toll from the virus was only 9,000 because of patients with underlying conditions. That does not mean that someone who has hypertension or diabetes who dies of covid didn't die of covid-19. They did. So the numbers that you've been hearing, the 180,000-plus deaths, are real deaths from covid-19. Let that not be any confusion about that. It's not 9,000 deaths from covid-19. It's 180,000-plus deaths. Reporter: Dr. Fauci urging states not to let labor day celebrations ruin the fall. Colleges already scrambling to contain new outbreaks on campus. Ohio state reporting nearly 500 cases in just the first week of school. The state hitting 1,400 cases today, the large egs single-day jump in cases since July. The governor pointing to the return of college and grade school students. If we want our kids in school, which we do, then the way to do that is for us to slow this spread down. Eva, the department of health and human services planning to launch an expensive campaign, and some are talking about the cost of this? Reporter: That's right. ABC news has confirmed that the dpt is pitching a $250 million public relations push. According to a letter obtained by politico, the goal is to defeat despair and inspire hope. Now, house majority whip Jim Clyburn says this looks like $250 million of taxpayer money being used politically, but the administration insists this is about health, not politics. Tom? All right, Eva, thank you. We do move on now to the

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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