A Look Back at the Damage of Hurricane Katrina on 10-Year Anniversary

ABC News' Bob Woodruff reports on the recovery efforts of the Gulf Coast city after it was struck by the powerful storm on August 29, 2005.
2:50 | 08/29/15

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Transcript for A Look Back at the Damage of Hurricane Katrina on 10-Year Anniversary
And we move now to the ten-year anniversary of hurricane Katrina. On August 29th, 2005 Katrina slammed into New Orleans. The vicious storm left parts of that city under water and now ten years later some neighborhoods of the crescent city are still rebuilding, however others are back and they are better than ever. ABC's bob woodruff is there with more. Good morning, bob. Reporter: Good morning, Paula. Yeah, you know, there will be a street parade, believe it or not, throughout the city today. It's really a reminder of what happened ten years ago, but also a celebration of how this city has recovered. Ten years ago, hurricane Katrina completely ripping through the gulf. New Orleans was right in its path with wind and then water. Bursting through the levees. First burying the ninth ward. From the helicopters up above, to the streets below, the city was changed. Today, New Orleans is back. The economy now is booming. Katrina is considered the single most catastrophic natural disaster in U.S. History, $135 billion in damage, more than 1800 dead. The city was just not prepared. Although about half of new Orleans people left the city in its wake, today more than 90% of its population is back. Ten years ago in the darkness of the superdome I could never forget that 10-year-old girl Erica Harris. Are you getting water and food? I'm not drinking that water. That water is hot. Reporter: Wit days she fled with her mother to Houston and never returned. How badly do you want to get out of here? Bad. Reporter: This week we found her. Can you believe we traced you down? After living through foster care and family tragedies today is thriving in Houston. Honor opportunity in college, a volunteer in Haiti planning to become a minister. I can help so many other people in ways that others can't because of what I've gone through and had to experience and had to overcome. Reporter: She is so, so inspiring. Now three U.S. Presidents are participating in the celebration of resilience and presidents Obama and bush have already spoken. All of this will culminate with bill Clinton speaking tonight at a big rally at the city's basketball arena. Paula, Tom. Bob, it's all about those stories like Erica's thank you. You hear about her story, the city rising from the ashes, just look at the story that she's now able and the platform she harkes as well. Yeah, in many ways new Orleans is better than it was before Katrina. There's less people but they'll tell you there's more restaurants and watching bob's reporting I just remember I was in biloxi, biloxi was devastated and right after the storm hit, they said New Orleans missed the bullets and then the levees broke and game over. Glad to hear the stories and see the changes. One of the moments you'll never forget. We turn over to Ron with the other stories we're tracking

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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