Company offers to implant microchips in employees

Around 50 employees at Wisconsin-based Three Square Market are preparing to have microchips implanted between their forefingers and thumbs that are designed to allow them to more easily make purchases and enter the office.
2:53 | 07/25/17

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Transcript for Company offers to implant microchips in employees
love this big board. Oh, yeah. It's a big move at an office that could change the way a lot of Americans work. A tech company in Wisconsin is offering to implant tiny microchips into its employees. Not just -- but the chips could allow people to unlock office doors, make purchases, Rebecca, come on here. So many questions about this, robin and Michael. Good morning. We asked a lot of them. This is the first American company to ever try this. One week from today many of the employees including the CEO will voluntarily have the microchips implanted into their bodies and they're calling it, I'm not kidding here, a chips and salsa party. This morning, like a scene straight out of 007. So you can keep an eye on me? Reporter: Employees at three square market making that fantasy a reality implanting their own bodies with microchips. What did the employees say when you brought this idea to them? Half of them actually within five seconds says yes. Reporter: CEO Todd Westby along with 50 of his 80 colleague, even his wife and kids preparing to implant these chips, the size of a grain of rice, between their forefingers and thumbs so they can do everything from buy snacks in the break room to log in in the morning to unloging doors with just the swipe of a hand. What did it take to persuade the hold-outs? Basically we had to explain to them there's no tracking of the information. It's not gps or anything like that. Reporter: The radio frequency technology in the devices approved by the fda will be inserted with a small needle by a licensed technician. Some internet experts warn the convenience could come at a cost. Many things start off with the best of intentions, but sometimes intentions turn. We've survived thousands of years as a species without being microchipped. Any particular need to did it now. Reporter: Participation is optional and some are holding out. There's always the fear of infection, so it's the unknown right now. Reporter: But many are excited to give the new technology a try. I think it's kind of cool. Pop it up there and it'll work. Just pop it up there. It's that simple so to give you a sense here's a grain of rice, the chips will be inserted like this grain of rice right here between your thumb and forefinger and most of the employees have opted in. It is voluntary. One size fits all, I guess. Now what happens if you get the implant and you're like I don't want this anymore. So they told me in case this happens, you pop it out. You literally push it out the way you would push a splinter out of your hand. Yes, hmm. Hmm. Okay. Are you on board?

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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