Investigation begins after police bodycam shows botched raid

In February 2019, Chicago police raided the wrong apartment and handcuffed Anjanette Young. The video was just made public, and Mayor Lori Lightfoot apologized for the incident at a press conference.
2:54 | 12/18/20

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Transcript for Investigation begins after police bodycam shows botched raid
Next tonight, the police raid, outrage in Chicago. Officers barging into the wrong home, it turned out. The social worker who lived there handcuffed. She was wearing nothing. Tonight, the city now releasing the body cam video and the mayor is now issuing an apology. Here's ABC's Alex Perez. Go, go, go. Search warrant! Reporter: Tonight, an investigation under way after this disturbing police body cam video shows officers with guns drawn storming into this Chicago apartment. You've got the wrong house. I live alone! Reporter: The social worker who lives there, Anjanette young, was changing after coming home from work. Police handcuffing her as she stood there naked and humiliated. Tell me what's going on. To have to deal with police officers yelling at me, pointing guns at me -- no one should have to expncnce that. Reporter: The incident happened in February of 2019, but the video just now made public. It turns out police did have the wrong apartment. You got me in handcuffs, I'm naked, this is not right! Reporter: The police superintendent and Chicago mayor promising change. I have an obligation to make that wrong right. Reporter: And David, young and her attorneys say they plan to file a lawsuit against the city. In 2018, more than $85 million in taxpayer money was used to settle police misconduct cases here in Chicago. All right, Alex Perez reporting from Chicago tonight. Thank you, Alex. And we've been reporting here on that massive cyber attack on the U.S. Government. Sources telling aby news the Russian government is behind it and that it's much worse than first thought. Again tonight, Pierre Thomas. Reporter: Tonight, federal agencies scrambling, fearing enormous damage in what could be one of the largest cyber attacks in years. And today, this dire warning from homeland security's agency dewith cyber threats. The hack, quote, poses a grave risk to federal and local governments as well as Kris call infrastructure. The adversaries were going after U.S. Government, very sensitive areas of the U.S. Government. So, the impact of this across the board could be very large. Reporter: Sources telling ABC news that the suspected Russian government hackers may have been looking at sensitive emails and communications of U.S. Officials since the spring. And the list of federal agencies and departments potentially impacted growing. And word tonight that the energy department and its national nuclear security administration which oversees the nation's nuclear weapons stockpiles, had some of its networks breached. Energy officials confirmed the hack but said it did not impact national security functions. The compromise is tied to a company called solarwinds, a software used by not only U.S. Agencies, but most of the nation's four commune 500 companies. Pierre, thank you. When we come back here

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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